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Regular version of the site

Book chapter

Intercultural Communication: A 17-year Analysis of the State of the Discipline

Bardhan S., Colvin J., Croucher S. M., O’Keeffe M., Dong Q.

Our world today, where global actions affect local dynamics and local conditions have global repercussions (Giddens, 1996; Appadurai, 1996; Beck, 1998; Bauman, 2000; Castells, 2002), provides expediencies and significant implications for internationalizing higher education. The importance of curriculum internationalization in the field of communication, as the chapters in this volume demonstrate, is manifold. In this study, we focus on the state of internationalization in “intercultural” communication research; specifically, this chapter is a review and evaluation of the state of internationalization in intercultural communication research in the last two decades and a commentary on how this benefits and/or presents challenges to internationalization of the communication curriculum.

International research endeavors have several benefits for both faculty and students (NCA, 2017). Those who undertake international research often gain a comprehensive understanding of the global dynamics of communication and the opportunities and challenges associated with scholarship dealing with international content and components. This type of research also facilitates the development of scholars’ international quotient; they become more aware of and sensitive to international dynamics, and they can provide more perceptive and comprehensive communication analysis by focusing on the complex and nuanced interconnections between the local and the global and forefronting the context-specific and comparative nature of communication.