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Article

Жизнь и смерть Феодорца Владимирского: право или расправа?

Виноградов А. Ю., Желтов М. с.

The article gives an attempt to uncover the legal background of extraordinary actions related to Theodore, the pretender to the metropolitan see of Vladimir-on-Klyazma, who was eventually given a derogatory nickname, Theodorets. A Greek presbyter (most probably), once deposed or for some other reason deproved from a church he was assigned to, he either acquired the status of the hypopsephios of Souzdal, or even was actually consecrated as a bishop by Klim Smolyatich. However, despite all attempts of prince Andrey Bogolyubsky to officially install him as a Metropolitan of Vladimir, Theodore’s canonical status was never recognized neither by Constantine II, Metropolitan of Kiev, nor by the then Patriarch of Constantinople, Luke Chrysoberges. Both of the just mentioned Greek hierarchs denied Theodore’s legitimacy and blamed him. Their reasons included his active role in disputes concerning the new fasting rules, introduced by the representatives of the reformed Byzantine monasticism of the time. When prince Andrey realized that his plan to create a Metropolitan see in Vladimir has failed, he decided to send Theodore to Kiev in order to receive proper episcopal consecration from Metropolitan Constantine II. Theodore responded by a refusal to obey, and tried to demonstrate his power instead, blatantly closing all church buildings in Vladimir. In the end, Andrey handed Theodore over to the Metropolitan’s court. Metropolitan Constantine II decided to sue Theodore according the norms of the Byzantine civil law (obviously, considering him as a Byzantine citizen), and since the charges against Theodore included heresy, he was condemned to brutal physical injuries and, finally, death. Afterwards the body of the unsuccessful contender to a metropolitan throne was thrown to the dogs, in order to get a symbolical closure on his story.