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Regular version of the site

Article

Using Interactive Teaching Methods When Forming Bachelors' Professional Competencies in Management Studies

Academic Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies. 2013. Vol. 2. No. 3. P. 463-471.
Georgieva N. Y., Shakina M. A.

Russia's participation in the Bologna process led to the need to adapt training programs for bachelors, as well as teaching methods in accordance with the need to build bachelors’ core competencies in management studies. In these circumstances it is important for both teachers and students to change the form of joint participation in the process of delivering and acquiring knowledge. The teacher cannot only translate knowledge, since in this case students should behave as independently functioning and decision-making subjects. Otherwise, they will not be able to master the necessary competencies and will not possess the qualities necessary for managers. One solution to this problem is using interactive teaching methods, such as role-playing, case studies, videos, case studies, business games, design methods, and others. All these methods are aimed at the acquisition and interpretation of experience. The “Learning by Doing” approach, which is the basis for interactive technologies, opens great opportunities for semantic construction of the educational process and bringing it closer to real life. When doing the research, the authors developed a model of competencies that are formed during the "Developing Management Decisions" course. In the analysis of interactive methods we correlated competences that are to be formed at the end of the course and those formed by means of using interactive methods. Besides, the authors developed and tested some role-playing and simulation business games. We developed and tested the "Interactive Lecture" method; we formed a sufficient database of interactive methods that are obligatorily included in all seminars. Moreover, we conducted studies eliciting managerial qualities that undergraduate students possess before and after interactive classes. Finally, we reviewed and analyzed the dynamics of these changes.