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Статья

The Austrian Experience: The Mamardashvili Variant

Transcultural Studies. 2015. Vol. 5. No. 1. P. 65-73.

Mamardashvili suggests that one can only come to understand the Viennese experience in relation to one’s own personal experience, the experience of “one’s own dignity of being.” At some stage one is supposed to experience “the passionate feeling of being alive and the repeated inalienability of one’s own existence.” The problem is that an unexpected adversary – culture – obstructs this passion through its central tenet: a human individual ceases to be an animal and becomes human by submitting to the norms of culture. To this, the philosopher’s objection is: “being, which is the highest form of man’s vanity, has no guarantees, there is no mechanism which can produce the effect of being or existence in a consistent and reliable manner.” The great Austrians, to their credit according to Mamardashvili, restored this proud feeling of the non-guarantee of being to culture.