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Regular version of the site

Book chapter

The Tragedy of Philosophy and the Philosophy of Tragedy (Sergey N. Bulgakov and Lev I. Shestov)

P. 192-211.

The tragedy of Bulgakov is the tragedy of philosophy. The tragedy of Shestov is the philosophy of tragedy. Tragedy is a key word; it is therein that the thoughts of both philosophers overlap. From the standpoint of Bulgakov, the tragedy of being is not to be solved in the ‘philosophy of tragedy’, for this philosophy itself is not tragic, it does not live in tragedy, but only reasons on it. Bulgakov’s idea of uniting theology and philosophy should have seemed intolerably false to Shestov as, in his opinion, it could only bring to deviation from faith, to its blending into philosophy and not to the latter’s rising to the knowledge of God. ‘The tragedy of Philosophy’, according to Bulgakov, is, first of all, recognition of insolvability of the main tasks, the philosophical reason is setting for itself: looking into causes of the world evil, possibility of freedom, sense of history, the unity of things in the great Whole. The form taken by this tragedy is antinomianism.

In book

The Tragedy of Philosophy and the Philosophy of Tragedy (Sergey N. Bulgakov and Lev I. Shestov)
Edited by: W. C. Gay, A. N. Chumakov. Vol. 288: Contemporary Russian philosophy. Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2016.