• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site

Article

Образы современности в XXI веке: гипермодернизм

Философский журнал. 2019. Т. 12. № 2. С. 20-33.

Within the socio-philosophical and cultural trend, usually referred to with the umbrella term “post-postmodernism”, there exist several conceptions, which offer a language that describes the new epoch. The so-called “hypermodernism” turned out to be one of the most demanded versions of post-postmodernism. Using historical and philosophical methodology, critical analysis, contextualism, as well as the methodology of contempo - rary social theory and theory of culture, the author identifies the goal of the paper in determining whether the social theory of hypermodernism can be an adequate alternative to postmodernism. To accomplish this goal the author considers three versions of hypermodernism in the order of their chronological appearance, conducts a comparative analysis of each of them (since “hypermodernism” was understood in different ways at different times) and, finally, critically examines the most popular concept of hypermodernism. The first version of hypermodernism was proposed by two Canadian political theorists, Arthur Kroker and David Сook, who understood it as an alternative to postmodernism in the mid-1980’s. Under the influence of the ideas of Jean Baudrillard, they focused their attention on the transformations of aesthetics in the new era (hyper-aesthetics of “excrements” against anti-aesthetics of postmodern). Later Arthur Kroker and Marilouise Kroker used the term “hypermodernism” in the context of “Theses on the Disappearing Body in the Hyper-Modern Condition”. The second version proposed by a British media theorist John Armitage attempted to describe the "dromology" of the French social philosopher Paul Virilio as “hypermodernistic”. However, neither the first nor the second concept of hypermodernism became popular. The third and most popular version of the “time of hypermodern” (hyperindividualism and hyperconsumerism) was the theory of the French social philosopher Gilles Lipovetsky. His understanding of hypermodernism is developed today by a number of sociologists in France and even in the English-speaking world. However, even this version of hypermodernims did not gain a wide enough influence. The author concludes that hypermodernism is a “weak alternative” to postmodernism.