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Article

Восприятие русской литературы в Британии в конце XIX — начале XX века

Колыхалова О. А., Кулдошина А. Ю.

The purpose of the article is to analyze the existing ideas about Russian literature in Britain at the end of the 19th and first half of the 20th centuries. A brief overview of the advancement of works of Russian classics among British readers is given. The spread of Russian literature in Britain was progressing slowly for a long time due to the difficulty in translation and the lack of interest in Russia and Russian culture. However, at the end of the 19th and first half of the 20th centuries, the situation changed in the literary community of Britain. This period saw a plethora of publications of translations of Russian fiction that were accomplished by professional translators, Slavonic scholars, and writers and appeared in periodicals and other print formats. The article provides an overview of the translation of works of F.M. Dostoevsky, L.N. Tolstoy, A.P. Chekhov, who have become the most understandable and accessible to the English mentality thanks to such outstanding translators as C. Garnett, Aylmer and Louise Maude, S.S. Koteliansky (who worked in collaboration with V. Woolf, J.M. Murry), R.E.C. Long and others. Having gained access to high-quality translations of Russian classics, British writers began to study their work in more detail. The British saw the influence of English and European writers (W. Shakespeare, Ch. Dickens, J.-J. Rousseau, J.W. Goethe, V. Hugo, etc.), e.g. in the works of F.M. Dostoevsky. However, later the creation of Russian writers influenced the Western novel, modifying it. There is an opinion that the works of A. P. Chekhov, made by Garnett, changed the English short story, making it exactly as we know it. V. Woolf, J. Joyce, B. Shaw, J. Galsworthy, A. Bennett and others admired the depth, style, and language of Russian writers. Translation of works of great Russian authors facilitated the flow of information about Russia and expanded the British view of the country and people. This once again confirms the fact of mutual cultural exchange between the two countries from a historical perspective. It can be argued that, despite all the complexities of the relationship, the mutual influence of the literatures of the two countries is obvious.