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Статья

Do delayed judgements of learning reduce metamemory illusions? A meta-analysis

Karlos L., Martín-Luengo B., Albuquerque P. B.

Past studies have shown that the perceptual characteristics of studied items (eg, font size) lead to a metamemory illusion, and that delayed judgments of learning (JOLs) are better predictors of memory performance than immediate. Here, we tested whether delayed JOLs could reduce or eliminate the effect of perceptual characteristics on JOLs and restudy decisions. We adopted a meta-analytic approach and analysed the results of 28 experiments in which participants' studied items were presented in either large or small font. JOLs and, sometimes, restudy, decisions were made either immediately or after a delay. Finally, the participants completed a memory test. The results of the meta-analyses confirmed the effect of the size on JOLs and restudy decisions. The delayed procedures reliably reduced the effect of perceptual characteristics on JOLs, but the effect was still significant after a delay. For restudy decisions, delayed procedures only reduced numerically the effect. Surprisingly, the meta-analysis also showed a very significant difference in size and size. One plausible explanation is that after a delay. In addition, our results suggest that the dissociation between memory and metamemory is reported previously, may not be dissociation at all, but a mistmatched effect on the size of memory and metamemory. For restudy decisions, delayed procedures only reduced numerically the effect. Surprisingly, the meta-analysis also showed a very significant difference in size and size. One plausible explanation is that after a delay. In addition, our results suggest that the dissociation between memory and metamemory is reported previously, may not be dissociation at all, but a mistmatched effect on the size of memory and metamemory. For restudy decisions, delayed procedures only reduced numerically the effect. Surprisingly, the meta-analysis also showed a very significant difference in size and size. One plausible explanation is that after a delay. In addition, our results suggest that the dissociation between memory and metamemory is reported previously, may not be dissociation at all, but a mistmatched effect on the size of memory and metamemory. although no individual study showed a significant difference. One plausible explanation is that after a delay. In addition, our results suggest that the dissociation between memory and metamemory is reported previously, may not be dissociation at all, but a mistmatched effect on the size of memory and metamemory. although no individual study showed a significant difference. One plausible explanation is that after a delay. In addition, our results suggest that the dissociation between memory and metamemory is reported previously, may not be dissociation at all, but a mistmatched effect on the size of memory and metamemory.