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Regular version of the site

Book chapter

COLOUR-WORD STROOP AND ENGLISH-RUSSIAN BILINGUALS

P. 62-63.
Kuznetsova L., Монтеро Жункейра де Миранда Л. -., Arsalidou M., Pisarenko S.

People tend to read regular words as a whole regardless of correct and incorrect spelling.  For example, research shows that when the first and last letter positions remain the same in word the rest of the letters can be in any position and our mind is still able to read the word (Grainger and Whitney, 2004). This is important as it shows that our mind can derive meaning even in misleading situations.  Misleading situations require the inhibition of irrelevant information.  The color-word Stroop, a popular measure of inhibition, is a task that relies heavily on reading proficiency.  Classic research shows that manipulating letter position in the Stroop test still elicits longer reaction times for incongruent conditions in adults (Regan, 1978; McCown and Arnoult, 1981). Our research shows that orthographic manipulations (i.e., changing letter positions in a word) have an effect on the word’s readability and that children as young as seven years can experience the Stoop effect when first and last positions of a colour word remain the same (onarge written in purple; Arsalidou et al., 2013). The purpose of this study was to examine effects of letter position in the color-word Stroop in the English and Russian language in English-Russian bilingual adults.