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Regular version of the site

Book chapter

«Мое сердце не принимает иного пути»: газель Хафиза о тщетных советах

С. 365-380.

The paper includes a translation of the ghazal _“Dil-am juz mihr-i mah-rūyān ṭarīq-ī bar-namīgīrad”_ (“My heart follows no other path save love of the moon-faced”. We prepared it for the second volume of the complete philological translation of the Divan (for the first volume, ghazals 1 ‒ 100  see [Hafiz 2012] in the _Literature_ to the article).

The introductory part contains some preliminary data on the given poem. Hafiz composed it as an ‘answer’ to the ghazal of Shah Shujaʻ, the ruler of Shiraz and the patron of the poet (regretfully the sources preserved only the opening two half lines of the ruler’s poem). The “pearls” or lines of the ghazal seem unstrung; it counts 14 beyts (almost twice the standard number), what enhances the effect of semantic disintegration. The poem serves as a good example of Hafiz’s signature poetic technique of associative and parallel montage of themes and images. 

The Persian text of the ghazal (according to Qazvini‒Gani version) and its Russian prose equilinear translation is followed by the detailed commentary to each beyt of the poem. It contains some philological particulars about the wording and imagery and the arguments on the choice of a given interpretation. We also trace the main themes of the poem as we see them, one of them being the “futility of advice”, and the other ‒ “the futility of poetry”.  The complex interplay of those two themes is what keeps the sequence of “disintegrated” lines together. It also highlights the great poet's overall message of “the weary feeling of the futility of words”.