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Regular version of the site

Book

Публичная история и коллективная память

Вып. 112. М.: Неприкосновенный запас, 2017.
Compiler: И. А. Калинин

The 112nd NZ issue comprises three topical sections as well as several stand-alone articles that tie in with the main themes in some way or another.

The first section focuses on one of the most urgent problems of today's humanities and social sciences, that of the relationship between history, treated as a public phenomenon rather than an academic subject, and a collective memory of the past. This section opens with “Public History: Between Academic Research and Practice”, a survey by Andrey Zavadsky, Egor Isaev, Artem Kravchenko, Varvara Sklez and Ekaterina Suverina. The first part of the article summarises existing studies of the range of problems under discussion, while the second part is centred on the conference "The Past: A Foreign Country?" held in 2016 at the Department of Media (National Reserch University "High School of Economy"). Three talks delivered at the conference, revised and extended, continue the theme. In his article “Prince Svyatoslav and the Politics of Memory”, Viktor Shnirelman analyses in detail the transformation of the image of Prince Svyatoslav, the ruler of the Kievan Rus, into one of the key figures in present-day Russian nationalists' propaganda and “historical research”. Galina Yankovskaya writes about the role played by Stalin-era art in public and museum spaces and urban practices. In “Commemorative practices in Modern Kabardino-Balkaria”, Dmitry Prasolov uses the region as an example to examine the “politics of memory”. Especially interesting is his analysis of the Soviet past as perceived by different peoples: things shared by and dividing them in relation to that past. The section ends with an article by Ivan Sablin, Liliya Bolyachevets and Serensamuu Budatsyrenova on the representation of historical memory in contemporary Buryat literature. “Buryat-Mongolia Online and Offline: Contemporary Literature and Historical Memory” discusses the idea of a “Buryat-Mongolian state”, dating back to the early 20th century (it found a political and administrative implementation in the 1920s, when an autonomous republic of that name was formed), and the shape this notion takes today in Buryat literature and on the Internet.

Chapters
Публичная история и коллективная память