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Working paper

Динамика субъективного социального статуса при потере работы: анализ профессиональных различий

Numerous economic, sociological and psychological studies show that job loss leads to the major decline of social position measured by various indicators like income level, subjective wellbeing, life chances, job-search abilities. Job loss also leads to the serious downfall of subjective social status. However the connection between job loss and subjective social status dynamics remains to be insuffi ciently investigated. Thus little is actually known about the differences in perceptions of social position decline that come as a result of occupation-specifi c characteristics of previous employment. Given the considerable heterogeneity of employment itself, the effect of previous occupation membership on subjective social status dynamics in case of job loss may differ considerably. So the question occurs: for which occupational groups job loss is more painful in terms of subjective social status decline? Do unemployment transition and labour market exit differ in terms of its consequences for subjective social status decline for various occupational groups? Present study was conducted on the basis of the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey – Higher School of Economics (RLMS – HSE) for 2000–2012 and focuses on the role of previous occupation engagement on the dynamics of subjective social status of the unemployed and out of labour force individuals. Empirical stage of analysis included both descriptive measures (transition probabilities matrices analysis, comparisons of occupation-specifi c subjective social status means before and after job loss, identifi cation of occupations with higher probabilities of job loss) and estimations of panel regression models with fi xed effects. Results presented clarify the social penalty of job loss for various occupations on the Russian labour market and position of occupational groups in a modern Russian society.