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Regular version of the site

Book chapter

Informal, Unorganized Volunteering

P. 223-241.
Nezhina T. G., Einolf C. J., Prouteau L., Ibrayeva A.

Abstract       

 Informal volunteering, or helping individuals in a way not coordinated by an organization, is the most common type of human helping behavior but one of the least studied. The psychological motives for informal volunteering are similar to those for formal volunteering, but income and socioeconomic status do not affect informal volunteering. Informal volunteering is common in both wealthy and poor countries, and welfare state service provision does not crowd out informal volunteering. Little is known about the individual and social benefits of informal volunteering, and the state of knowledge is not yet complete enough to inform policy. However, using existing informal helping networks can make development and other projects more effective. Future research should collect better data on informal volunteering, particularly longitudinal and comparative data.

In book

Informal, Unorganized Volunteering
Edited by: D. H. Smith, R. A. Stebbins, J. Grotz. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016.