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  • Организация власти в многоуровневых политических системах и обмен ресурсами: голоса, бюджеты, информация

Article

Организация власти в многоуровневых политических системах и обмен ресурсами: голоса, бюджеты, информация

Григорьев И. С., Декальчук А. А., Губайдуллина С. Ш.

The paper reviews the most recent findings in multilevel governance and multilevel political systems. Multilevel governance is defined here as a distribution and sustainable patterns of exchange of the major power resources between autonomous centers of power (governments) situated at different levels within the multilevel structure. Following the trend laid down for the federalism and decentralization research by Tulia Falleti, we distinguish between three types of resources: the budgets (the monetary resources pertaining to fiscal financial flows), the information (mostly provided from the lower to the upper levels of government), and legitimacy (mostly the electoral and clientelist support supplied to each other by governments on different levels during elections). The article reveals the general trends within this research stream and outlines the existent gaps in our understanding of exchange and distribution of particular types of resources between different levels of government in multilevel governance. The first two sections provide a brief overview of the development of empirical research on federalism and multi-tiered systems, and explicate the rationale for the study of the distribution of resources between governments at different levels of power. Researching these resources’ exchange in the short run, and the long-term patters of such exchanges are two different research agendas. In particular, paying closer attention to the long-term sustainable patterns of resource exchange may serve as an explanation for higher or lower resilience in multilevel governance structures. Modeling such exchange may therefore serve as grounds for an endogenous theory of multilevel and federal governance. The second part of the paper provides a more detailed review of the most recent research into particular types of resources and their exchange between levels of government. We describe the “natural” asymmetries in these resources’ distribution between levels. Finally, the conclusion highlights the existent gaps and sets up the agenda for future research