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Статья

Theorizing Post-Soviet vs. Eastern Nationalism: Implications and Alternatives

Politikos mokslų almanachas. 2012. Vol. 2. P. 103-110.
One of the main issues of nationalism studies throughout its history has been the search for the justified position of the academic discourse on nationality with regards to the reality it attempts to rationally explain. Not only was it difficult to abandon the overtly ideological reasoning of the Fichtean kind (Fichte, 1978), but it was and remains to be almost impossible to completely avoid implicit conformity to the public opinion dictated by an agenda formed by key relevant events. In the history of contemporary nationalism studies, one can see occasional rise of condemnation of nationalism prompted by atrocities like those committed in the ex-Yugoslavia (Kecmanovic, 2001; Miscevic, 2003) or, adversely, cautious attempts of rehabilitation inspired by events like “velvet revolutions” (Hübner, 1991), both lines of reasoning posed against the background of mild critical disapproval of nationalism as such. It seems obvious that for any social science its active distortion of and by the reality it studies is as ideological as tacit conformity to it. However, it remains unclear to what extent the objectivity, or constant self-reflection striving towards objectivity, is impaired in the case of neither distortion nor conformity, but mere confirmation of reality under scrutiny instead of constructing research subject following the immanent logic of the academic field. In this article we analyze a case of such confirmation and its implications regarding the two alternative ways of studying nationalism in a certain geographical part of the world.