• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site

Working paper

Russia: Bank Assistance for Social Protection

Operations Evaluation Department Partnerships & Knowledge Programs. World Bank OEDPK. The World Bank, 2002. No. 27970.
Kolosnitsyna M., Topinska I.
This paper is one of the background papers prepared by outside experts as an input to the Russia Country Assistance Evaluation (Task Manager, Gianni Zanini) by the Operations Evaluation Department (OED) of the World Bank. Findings are based on a review of project appraisal and completion reports, sector reports, and a number of other documents produced by the Borrower, the Bank, and research papers in the academic literature. Three factors influenced the Bank decision to launch social protection lending programs in the Russian Federation (RF) at the beginning of the decade: (1) economic performance (high inflation, decline of GDP, consumption, real wages, and household incomes), and the increase of inequality and poverty; (2) expected unemployment; and (3) inefficiency of social protection (SP). Two projects were carried out: the Employment Service and Social Protection (ESSP) loan and the Social Protection Adjustment Loan (SPAL). The first and second Coal Sector Adjustment Loans (Coal SECAL) also contained measures aimed to assist coal workers who were laid off from liquidated or reorganized coal mines, and the analysis and monitoring of social consequences of the coal industry restructuring.  Overall, the projects’ priorities were consistent with the country development needs in the field of SP, and thus their relevance can be assessed as “substantial.” However, there were major shortcomings in project design. Moreover, the amount of resources spent was disproportionate to the results obtained. Thus, both efficacy and efficiency can be rated as “modest.” Also, in terms of institutional development, the appropriate rating is “modest,” since the projects failed to contribute significantly to the government’s ability to effectively use resources. In terms of sustainability, the general direction of reform is likely to be sustained, but the projects’ limited institutional achievements, including those under the ESSP, are of somewhat uncertain sustainability, since the government has no plans for follow up on project implementation, and resources are scarce. In the case of the SPAL, the Bank failed to use the opportunities of multiple tranches and key conditions to ensure the continuity of reform efforts in selected SP fields.