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Regular version of the site

Book chapter

Происхождение и эволюция «купольного зала»

С. 48-73.

The publication aims to justify the applicability of the term ‘Kuppelhalle’ [single-nave domed church] to Byzantine architecture and reconstruct the development of the Kuppelhalle in the Byzantine world. Single-nave domed churches were present in several types. The most common variant had a rectangular naos divided by dome supports into a number of subsequent bays with a dome over the central bay. This type originated in the late fourth – early fifth century and is widespread in Spain, Apulia, Hellas, Greek islands, Minor Asia, Abkhazia, Armenia and Eastern Georgia. Kuppelhalle varied in dome carrying structures (with or without pilasters), bay sizes and dome shapes (regular or narrow), and may have had blind arches or additional compartments. ‘Genuine’ Kuppelhalle must not be confused with Phrygian-Lydian and South Italian single-nave churches with two domes. The second type combines a narrow narthex opening into a naos in the form of ‘compactly inscribed (atrophied Greek) cross’; this type developed independently in Pontus and Western Georgia in the ninth century, in Campania in the ninth – tenth centuries (?) and in Raška (Serbia) in the second half of the twelfth century. In other types of Kuppelhalle, increased pilaster protrusion resulted in shorter lateral ‘cross arms’ (on the exterior as well as the interior) and the growing convergence of Kuppelhalle with the ‘compactly inscribed cross’ type; the latter gave rise to a combination of the Kuppelhalle and the inscribed cross church which subsequently underwent serious transformations in the Post-Arabic Caucasus.

In book

Edited by: Е. С. Степанова, В. Н. Залесская СПб.: Издательство Государственного Эрмитажа, 2019.