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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 7
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Book
Moulin H. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995.

Over the past fifty years game theory has had a major impact on the field of economics. It was for work in game theory that the 1994 Nobel Prize in Economics was awarded. Although non-cooperative game theory is better known, the theory of cooperative games has contributed a number of fundamental ideas to microeconomic analysis.Cooperative Microeconomics is the definitive textbook on these contributions.

Designed to be used by undergraduate and graduate students, the book provides a thorough introduction and overview of its subject. Hervé Moulin distinguishes among three primary modes of cooperation: cooperation by direct agreements; cooperation by just, equitable compromise; and cooperation by decentralized behavior. This tri-modal methodology is applied successively to the exchange of private goods, the fair division of unproduced commodities, the cooperative production of private and public goods, and cost-sharing.

Moulin proposes an elementary and self-contained exposition (supplemented by over 125 exercises) of the main cooperative concepts for microeconomic analysis, including core stability, deterministic solutions (such as the Shapley value), and several broad principles of equity (such as the No Envy and Stand Alone tests). The book also covers the most important failures of the decentralized behavior: the tragedy of the commons and the free rider problem in the provision of public goods. Cooperative Microeconomics is the first book of its kind, and it will be widely used in courses in microeconomics and game theory.

Added: Aug 23, 2016
Book
Inglehart R. F. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990.
Added: Mar 21, 2011
Book
Braguinsky S., Yavlinsky G. A. Princeton University Press, 2000.
Added: Feb 6, 2015
Book
Edited by: A. Greif, L. Kiesling, J. V. Nye. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2015.

This book brings together a group of leading economic historians to examine how institutions, innovation, and industrialization have determined the development of nations. Presented in honor of Joel Mokyr—arguably the preeminent economic historian of his generation—these wide-ranging essays address a host of core economic questions. What are the origins of markets? How do governments shape our economic fortunes? What role has entrepreneurship played in the rise and success of capitalism? Tackling these and other issues, the book looks at coercion and exchange in the markets of twelfth-century China, sovereign debt in the age of Philip II of Spain, the regulation of child labor in nineteenth-century Europe, meat provisioning in pre–Civil War New York, aircraft manufacturing before World War I, and more. The book also features an essay that surveys Mokyr’s important contributions to the field of economic history, and an essay by Mokyr himself on the origins of the Industrial Revolution.

Added: Mar 31, 2016
Book
Inglehart R. F. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997.
Added: Mar 21, 2011
Book
Suny R. G. Princeton University Press, 1972.
Added: Feb 9, 2015
Book
Suny R. G. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2015.

Starting in early 1915, the Ottoman Turks began deporting and killing hundreds of thousands of Armenians in the first major genocide of the twentieth century. By the end of the First World War, the number of Armenians in what would become Turkey had been reduced by ninety percent—more than a million people. A century later, the Armenian Genocide remains controversial but relatively unknown, overshadowed by later slaughters and the chasm separating Turkish and Armenian versions of events. In this definitive narrative history, Ronald Suny cuts through nationalist myths, propaganda, and denial to provide an unmatched account of when, how, and why the atrocities of 1915–16 were committed.

As it lost territory during the war, the Ottoman Empire was becoming a more homogenous Turkic-Muslim state, but it still contained large non-Muslim communities, including the Christian Armenians. The Young Turk leaders of the empire believed that the Armenians were internal enemies secretly allied to Russia and plotting to win an independent state. Suny shows that the great majority of Armenians were in truth loyal subjects who wanted to remain in the empire. But the Young Turks, steeped in imperial anxiety and anti-Armenian bias, became convinced that the survival of the state depended on the elimination of the Armenians. Suny is the first to explore the psychological factors as well as the international and domestic events that helped lead to genocide.

Drawing on archival documents and eyewitness accounts, this is an unforgettable chronicle of a cataclysm that set a tragic pattern for a century of genocide and crimes against humanity.

 

Ronald Grigor Suny is the Charles Tilly Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan, emeritus professor of political science at the University of Chicago, and a senior researcher at the National Research University–Higher School of Economics in St. Petersburg. He is the author of many books, includingThe Soviet Experiment and Looking toward Ararat: Armenia in Modern History, and the coeditor of A Question of Genocide: Armenians and Turks at the End of the Ottoman Empire. He lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Added: Feb 9, 2015