• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 9
Sort:
by name
by year
Book
Khlevniuk O. V. New Haven; L.: Yale University Press, 2009.

Based on meticulous research in previously  unavailable documents in the Soviet archives, this book illuminates the secret inner mechanisms of power in the Soviet Union during the years when Stalin established his notorious dictatorship. Book focuses on the top organ in Soviet Russia’s political hierarchy of the 1930s—the Political Bureau of the Central Committee of the Communist Party—and on the political and interpersonal dynamics that weakened its collective leadership and enabled Stalin’s rise.

Added: Jun 6, 2014
Book
Sharnova Elena, Eyerman C., Georgievskaya E. Houston: Yale University Press, 2002.

This volume, the catalogue for a collaborative exhibition in the United States between the State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, brings together a selection of notable French paintings from the Pushkin Museum, one of the world's great art museums. The text tells the story of the Russian taste for French art. Essays highlight such collectors as Catherine the Great, members of the Russian nobility such as the Yusupovs and the Golitsyns, and the early-20th-century merchant-patrons Sergei Shchukin and Ivan Morosov. The authors relate how works from these distinguished collections were united at the Pushkin Museum to form one of the most impressive arrays of French paintings outside of France. The volume reproduces and discusses 76 of the museum's most important holdings, including masterpieces by Nicolas Poussin, Jacques-Louis David, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Camille Corot, Auguste Renoir, Claude Monet, Vincent Van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Paul Cezanne, Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso, some of which, like Monet's "Le Boulevard des Capucines", are also landmark works in the history of art.

Added: Aug 25, 2015
Book
Brandenberger D. L. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011.

The USSR is often regarded as the world's first propaganda state. Particularly under Stalin, politically charged rhetoric and imagery dominated the press, schools, and cultural forums from literature and cinema to the fine arts. Yet party propagandists were repeatedly frustrated in their efforts to promote a coherent sense of "Soviet" identity during the interwar years. This book investigates this failure to mobilize society along communist lines by probing the secrets of the party's ideological establishment and indoctrinational system. An exposé of systemic failure within Stalin's ideological establishment, Propaganda State in Crisis ultimately rewrites the history of Soviet indoctrination and mass mobilization between 1927 and 1941.

Added: Apr 10, 2020
Book
Sheldon K. M., Williams G., Joiner T. Yale University Press, 2003.
Added: Sep 11, 2014
Book
Arrow K. J. NY: Yale University Press, 2012.

Originally published in 1951, Social Choice and Individual Valuesintroduced “Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem” and founded the field of social choice theory in economics and political science. This new edition, including a new foreword by Nobel laureate Eric Maskin, reintroduces Arrow’s seminal book to a new generation of students and researchers.

"Far beyond a classic, this small book unleashed the ongoing explosion of interest in social choice and voting theory. A half-century later, the book remains full of profound insight: its central message, ‘Arrow’s Theorem,’ has changed the way we think.”—Donald G. Saari, author of Decisions and Elections: Explaining the Unexpected   

Kenneth J. Arrow is professor of economics emeritus, Stanford University, and a Nobel laureate. Eric S. Maskin is Albert O. Hirschman Professor, School of Social Science, Institute of Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ, and a Nobel laureate.

Added: Oct 23, 2014
Book
Khlevniuk O. V. New Haven; L.: Yale University Press, 2015.

This sientific  biography, based on the vast archives of the Soviet era, offers portrait of Stalin the man and dictator. Without mythologizing Stalin as either benevolent or an evil genius, author resolves numerous controversies about specific events in the dictator’s life while assembling many hundreds of previously unknown letters, memos, reports, and diaries into a comprehensive, compelling narrative of a life that altered the course of world history.  

Added: Jul 24, 2015
Book
Edited by: D. L. Brandenberger, М. В. Зеленов. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2019.

The Short Course on the History of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (Bolsheviks) defined Stalinist ideology both at home and abroad. It was quite literally the the master narrative of the USSR—a hegemonic statement on history, politics, and Marxism-Leninism that scripted Soviet society for a generation. This study exposes the enormous role that Stalin played in the development of this all-important text, as well as the unparalleled influence that he wielded over the Soviet historical imagination.

Added: Apr 14, 2020
Book
Khlevniuk O. V., Davies R., Rees E. New Haven; L.: Yale University Press, 2003.

This volume publishes translations of 180 handwritten letters and coded telegrams exchanged during this period between Stalin and his most highly trusted deputy, Lazar Kaganovich. The collection of letters - all previously classified top secret - provides an account of the mainsprings of Soviet policy while Stalin was consolidating his position as personal dictator. The correspondence records his positions on major internal and foreign affairs decisions and reveals his opinions about fellow members of the Politburo and other senior figures.

Added: Jun 7, 2014
Book
Рут Гульд Р. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016.

Spanning the period between the end of the Russo-Caucasian War and the death of the first female Chechen suicide bomber, this groundbreaking book is the first to compare Georgian, Chechen, and Daghestani depictions of anticolonial insurgency. Rebecca Gould draws from previously untapped archival sources as well as from prose, poetry, and oral narratives to assess the impact of Tsarist and Soviet rule in the Islamic Caucasus. Examining literary representations of social banditry to tell the story of Russian colonialism from the vantage point of its subjects, among numerous other themes, Gould argues that the literatures of anticolonial insurgency constitute a veritable resistance—or “transgressive sanctity”—to colonialism.

Added: Mar 10, 2017