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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 6
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Article
Kononenko R. V., Karpova E. J. Anthropology of East Europe Review. 2012. Vol. 30. No. 2. P. 77-90.

The purpose of this article is to analyze the features of a modern social movement from the perspective of social capital as a combination of knowledge, skills and social practices, existing and reproduced in social networks. First we will discuss the social and historical context of societies in the era of late socialism when the groups of people interested in folklore and traditional folk culture began to appear. We will also discuss some features of the folklore lovers’ community as well as its features as a social movement aimed at the study, rebirth and spread of ethnomusical traditions. Further, we will discuss the way cultural memory, being formed in the process of collective actions of the movement members, becomes a resource of their group identity and the basis for accumulated social capital. The study is based on an analysis of four in-depth face-to-face interviews held in 2010 and eight interviews held online in 2011 with representatives of several generations of folklore movement members, as well as on long-term participant observation.

Added: Jan 27, 2013
Article
Pecherskaya N. V. Anthropology of East Europe Review. 2012. Vol. 30. No. 2. P. 20-38.

The aim of this article is to describe actors’ sense of justice that they intuitively embody in everyday life situations. To make everyday meanings of justice explicit we focus on an analysis of a very particular type of situation denunciations/justifications that appeared in everyday disputes in late soviet Russia.

Added: Jan 20, 2013
Article
Chernova Z. V. Anthropology of East Europe Review. 2012. Vol. 30. No. 2. P. 1-19.

This article represents a study of parenthood in contemporary Russia. It presents analysis of the characteristics of the Soviet type of parenthood when the state occupied the dominant position in the sphere of gender relations as well as in forming and assigning of parental roles. However, in contemporary Russia, in spite of the pronatalist character of family policy, oriented towards support of the well-to-do problem-free family, parenthood becomes the platform of meaning on the basis of which new collective identities are built and new practices of parenthood appear. Parents not only bear personal responsibility for wellbeing of their children but are ready to cooperate in order to help each other in solving everyday problems. 

Added: Apr 15, 2013
Article
Shpakovskaya L. L. Anthropology of East Europe Review. 2014. Vol. 32. No. 1. P. 43-59.

The article deals with the gender and class aspects of mechanisms of exclusion and barriers to access to public services  for migrants from former Soviet national republics in contemporary Russia, with a focus on Armenian women's practices of using the healthcare and pre-school care services. The author analyzes institutional and cultural barriers to access to  services. Institutional barriers are created by legal status of migrants. The absence of citizenship presents a constraint on obtaining public medical services. Use of pre-school care services (kindergarten) contradicts   the gender culture shared by Armenian women. These cultural barriers are discussed in the context of migrants' gender culture.  Gender culture is conceptualized through the concept of the gender paradigm as a main cultural code providing meaning to women's everyday practices. For Armenian women the gender paradigm is described as patriarchy. Social exclusion and strategies of coping with the patriarchy also have the class dimension. Institutional barriers are overcome using economic and social resources of migrants. The norms of patriarchal gender culture are interpreted pragmatically and are less rigid among educated classes.

Added: Oct 22, 2014
Article
Krivonos D. Anthropology of East Europe Review. 2015. Vol. 33. No. 1.

The article explores the relationships between the state and youth through the narratives of activists of the Russian youth movement Nashi. The research is based on ethnographic fieldwork among young activists in St Petersburg and Moscow during the political rallies and in the annual educational youth camp “Seliger”. The article analyses how major transformations in the pro-Kremlin youth movement, adhering to the political agenda of the state were subjectively interpreted and understood by young activists using the tools of narrative analysis. The article suggests that despite the high demand for loyalty to the state agenda, young people construct their own definitions and justifications of their state-managed political activism, reconciling and differentiating between national, collective and personal subject positions of the activism.

Added: Jan 24, 2014
Article
Iarskaia-Smirnova E. R. Anthropology of East Europe Review. 2013. Vol. 31. No. 1. P. 21-41.

The aim of this research was to contribute to the discussion on the role of visual methods in improving student learning. Visual methods provide means to understand the practices of representations as cultural texts, to develop interpretations of meanings in socio-cultural context, to decode images of social relations and individual experience. Visual sources play a growing role in social studies as well as in teaching as they offer new routes to understanding the past and the present. It was anticipated that when students learn to interpret visual images of social issues as constructs and metaphors in addition to reading relevant literature they might develop critical and contextual imagination, namely connect individual incidences to historical conditions and social institutions, to link seemingly impersonal and remote forces with the lives of real people in concrete institutional and symbolic environments. The main data set included anonymous student journals and portfolio with assignments. The study documented student discourse around visual methods implementation and examined student identities as sociologists, their perceptions of academic expectations at universities, their views of the curriculum, and their identity claims. The results are concerned with the outcomes of teaching and learning considered not only in relation to visual methods but also to the public sphere and sociology. The more and less desirable identity for a sociologist was articulated, some tensions and biases were discovered but more research is needed in order to see more explicitly the role of visual methods and other pedagogical tools in overcoming these barriers.

Added: Jul 23, 2013