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Of all publications in the section: 33
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Article
Grigoryan L., Lebedeva N., Breugelmans S. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2018. Vol. 49. No. 2. P. 336-352.

This paper presents a cross-cultural study on the mediating role of implicit theories of innovativeness in the relationship between basic values and specific attitudes towards innovation. Modernized samples (399 Russians from Moscow and Novokuznetsk) and more traditional samples (194 Chechens and Ingushs from North Caucasus and 200 Tuvins from the Tuva Republic) within the Russian Federation answered Schwartz Value Survey (SVS) (Schwartz, 1992), measures of attitudes towards innovation (Lebedeva, Tatarko, 2009), and an Adjective Check List (Runco et al., 1993) adapted for measuring implicit theories of innovativeness in the current samples. Main findings include (1) a split in individual and social aspects of implicit theories of innovativeness, (2) different mediation of the effects of Openness to Change and Conservation values, and (3) differences in mediation models between the two samples. Implications of these findings for cross-cultural studies on innovativeness are discussed.

Added: Jun 1, 2015
Article
Breugelmans S., Van Hemert D., Brouwers S. et al. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2004. No. 35. P. 251-262.

Based on a random sample of 200 empirical articles, the present studymade a historical analysis of the contents of Journal of Cross-CulturalPsychology (JCCP) in the period between 1970 and 2004. In comparison to older studies, recent studies tended to be more social-psychological, and more often employed self-reports, based the choice of cultures on theoretical grounds, and adopted a hypothesis-testing approach. A persistent strong focus on cross-cultural differences and a simultaneous underrating ofcross-cultural similarities was found. The majority of studies in which onlycross-cultural differences were expected, reported differences and similarities. Methodological and conceptual improvements characterized the past 35 years of publications in JCCP

Added: Dec 24, 2014
Article
Cieciuch J., Schwartz S., Vecchione M. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2013. No. 44. P. 1213-1232.
Added: Nov 18, 2013
Article
Smith P., Wasti A., Grigoryan L. et al. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2014. Vol. 45. No. 6. P. 921-938.

Three dimensions of subordinate-supervisor relations (affective attachment, deference to supervisor, and personal-life inclusion) that had been found by Chen et al. (2009) to be characteristic of a guanxi relationship between subordinates and their supervisors in China were surveyed in Taiwan, Singapore and six non-Chinese cultural contexts. The affective attachment and deference subscales demonstrated full metric invariance whereas the personal-life inclusion subscale was found to have partial metric invariance across all eight samples. Structural equation modelling revealed that the affective attachment dimension had a cross-nationally invariant positive relationship to affective organizational commitment and a negative relationship to turnover intention. The deference to the supervisor dimension had invariant positive relationships with both affective and normative organizational commitment. The personal-life inclusion dimension was unrelated to all outcomes. These results indicate the relevance of aspects of guanxi to superior-subordinate relations in non-Chinese cultures. Studies of indigenous concepts can contribute to a broader understanding of organizational behavior.

Added: Nov 17, 2013
Article
Galyapina V. N., Lebedeva N., van de Vijver F. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2018. Vol. 49. No. 6. P. 976-992.

This article examines relationships between social identities and acculturation strategies of Russians (the ethnic minority) in the Republic of North Ossetia–Alania (RNO-A). The sample included 109 grandparent–parent–adolescent triads from ethnically Russian families (N = 327). We assessed acculturation strategies, ethnic and national identities (identification with the Russian Federation), republican identity (with the RNO-A), regional identity (with North Caucasus), and religious identity. EFA combined five identities in two factors, labeled Russian ethnocultural identity (comprising ethnic, national, and religious identities) and North-Caucasian regional identity (comprising identities involving the republic and region). The means of the identity factors remained remarkably stable across generations, with a somewhat stronger Russian ethnocultural identity. A structural equation model revealed that Russian ethnocultural identity was a negative predictor of assimilation (the least preferred acculturation strategy), whereas North-Caucasian regional identity was a positive predictor of integration (the most preferred strategy) in all generations. We concluded that Russian ethnocultural identity is important for maintaining the heritage culture whereas North-Caucasian regional identity promotes participation of ethnic Russians in the multicultural North-Ossetian society.

Added: May 28, 2018
Article
Robinson O. C., Lopez F. G., Ramos K. et al. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2013. Vol. 44. No. July. P. 719-737.

The study investigated interrelationships among trait authenticity, context-specific authenticity,

and well-being in three samples drawn from England, the United States, and Russia. Six hundred and

twenty-eight adults participated: 196 from the United States, 240 from England, and 192 from Russia.

The overall sample consisted of 151 men and 477 women with a mean age of 27 years (range

= 18 to 56). Authenticity was rated both as a general trait and specific to four contexts: with

partner, parents, friends, and work colleagues. Well-being was measured using a measure of positive

mental health. English and American samples showed higher mean authenticity levels than

the Russian sample. In all three subsamples, within-subjects differences in the context-specific

ratings were in the same ordinal series; authenticity was rated highest with partner, followed by

friends and parents, and lowest with work colleagues. Context and country showed an interaction

in their effect on authenticity; United States and England were higher than Russia in partner,

friend, and parent contexts but not in the work context. Trait and context-specific authenticity

measures contributed unique and significant variance to a prediction of well-being in all three

subsamples.

Added: Mar 25, 2015
Article
Owe E., Vignoles V., Becker M. et al. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2013. Vol. 44. No. 1. P. 24-45.

Beliefs about personhood are understood to be a defining feature of individualism-collectivism (I-C), but they have been insufficiently explored, given the emphasis of research on values and self-construals. We propose the construct of contextualism, referring to beliefs about the importance of context in understanding people, as a facet of cultural collectivism. A brief measure was developed and refined across 19 nations (Study 1: N = 5,241), showing good psychometric properties for cross-cultural use and correlating well at the nation level with other supposed facets and indicators of I-C. In Study 2 (N = 8,652), nation-level contextualism predicted ingroup favoritism, corruption, and differential trust of ingroup and outgroup members, while controlling for other facets of I-C, across 35 nations. We conclude that contextualism is an important part of cultural collectivism. This highlights the importance of beliefs alongside values and self-representations and contributes to a wider understanding of cultural processes.

Added: Apr 1, 2013
Article
Saucier G., Kenner J., Iurino K. et al. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2015. No. 46. P. 53-70.

We know that there are cross-cultural differences in psychological variables, such as individualism/collectivism. But it has not been clear which of these variables show relatively the greatest differences. The Survey of World Views project operated from the premise that such issues are best addressed in a diverse sampling of countries representing a majority of the world’s population, with a very large range of item-content. Data were collected online from 8,883 individuals (almost entirely college students based on local publicizing efforts) in 33 countries that constitute more than two third of the world’s population, using items drawn from measures  of nearly 50 variables. This report focuses on the broadest patterns evident in item data. The largest differences were not in those contents most frequently emphasized in cross-cultural psychology (e.g., values, social axioms, cultural tightness), but instead in contents involving religion, regularity-norm behaviors, family roles and living arrangements, and ethnonationalism.  Content not often studied cross-culturally (e.g., materialism, Machiavellianism, isms dimensions, moral foundations) demonstrated moderate-magnitude differences. Further studies are needed to refine such conclusions, but indications are that cross-cultural psychology may benefit from casting a wider net in terms of the psychological variables of focus.

Added: Nov 23, 2014
Article
Joshanloo M., Zarina Kh. Lepshokova, Panyusheva T. et al. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2014. Vol. 45. No. 2. P. 246-264.

A survey of the cultural notions related to happiness and the existing empirical evidence indicate that some individuals endorse the belief that happiness, particularly an immoderate degree of it, should be avoided. These beliefs mainly involve the general notion that happiness may lead to bad things happening. Using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis and multilevel modeling, this study investigates the measurement invariance, cross-level isomorphism, predictive validity, and nomological network of the fear of happiness scale across 14 nations. The results show that this scale has good statistical properties at both individual and cultural levels. The findings also indicate that this scale has the potential to add to the knowledge about how people conceive of, and experience, happiness across cultures.

Added: Mar 18, 2014
Article
Leung K., Ben L., Bond M. et al. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2012. Vol. 43. No. 5. P. 833-857.

Based on a deductive, culturally decentered approach, new items were generated to improve the reliability of the original Social Axioms Survey, which measures individuals’ general beliefs about the world. In Study 1, results from 11 countries support the original five-factor structure and achieve higher reliability for the axiom dimensions as measured by the new scale. Moreover, moderate but meaningful associations between axiom and Big-Five personality dimensions were found. Temporal change of social axioms at the culture level was examined and found to be moderate. In Study 2, additional new items were generated for social complexity and fate control, then assessed in Hong Kong and the United States. Reliability was further improved for both dimensions. Additionally, two subfactors of fate control were identified: fate determinism and fate alterability. Fate determinism, but not fate alterability, related positively to neuroticism. Other relationships between axiom and personality dimensions were similar to those reported in Study 1. The short forms of the axiom dimensions were generally reliable and correlated highly with the long forms. This research thus provides a stronger foundation for applying the construct of social axioms around the world.

Added: Nov 16, 2012
Article
Tatarko A., Mironova A. A., van de Vijver F. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2017. Vol. 48. No. 4. P. 542-559.

We examined the link between ethnic diversity and social capital to test Putnam’s hypothesis  on the negative impact of ethnic diversity on social capital. Data came from a representative  survey in two multicultural regions of Russia (N= 2,061). To assess the level of ethnic diversity,  an ethnic diversity index was calculated using data from the latest National Population Census  in Russia. Data were analyzed using two-level structural equation modeling. The results did not  confirm Putnam’s hypothesis and showed that ethnic diversity, as assessed in the latest National  Population Census in Russia, was not negatively related to social capital in Russia. We argue that  the long-standing ethnic diversity in Russia is positively related to informal sociability, and does  not affect generalized trust and community organizational life. It is concluded that Putnam’s  hypothesis does not have universal validity, presumably because the link between diversity and  social capital is moderated by various regional and national characteristics.

Added: Apr 20, 2017
Article
Welzel C., Delhey J. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2015. Vol. 46. No. 7. P. 875-896.

Trust in people is general insofar as it extends to out-groups, that is, unfamiliar and dissimilar others. But whether trust in out-groups can emerge independently from in-group trust is controversial, and conclusive evidence has been unavailable. This article fills this gap, analyzing which conditions create out-group trust independent from in-group trust. Using data from 76 countries around the world, we establish three insights. First, while a high level of in-group trust is the rule, out-group trust varies greatly across countries. Second, out-group trust emerges independent from in-group trust when human empowerment emancipates people from in-group control. Third, other conditions championed as trust-crediting forces do not confound the effect of human empowerment. In conclusion, trust generalizes to out-groups as a result of human empowerment’s emancipatory impulse. © 2015, © The Author(s) 2015.

Added: Sep 4, 2015
Article
Van de Vliert E., Welzel C., Shcherbak A. et al. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2018. Vol. 49. No. 7. P. 1048-1065.

The roots and routes of cultural evolution are still a mystery. Here, we aim to lift a corner of that veil by illuminating the deep origins of encultured freedoms, which evolved through centuries-long processes of learning to pursue and transmit values and practices oriented towards autonomous individual choice. Analyzing a multitude of data sources, we unravel for 108 Old World countries a sequence of cultural evolution reaching from (a) ancient climates suitable for dairy farming to (b) lactose tolerance at the eve of the colonial era to (c) resources that empowered people in the early industrial era to (d) encultured freedoms today. Historically, lactose tolerance peaks under two contrasting conditions: cold winters and cool summers with steady rain versus hot summers and warm winters with extensive dry periods (Study 1). However, only the cold/wet variant of these two conditions links lactose tolerance at the eve of the colonial era to empowering resources in early industrial times, and to encultured freedoms today (Study 2). We interpret these findings as a form of gene-culture coevolution within a novel thermo-hydraulic theory of freedoms.

Added: Jun 20, 2018
Article
Ryabichenko T., Lebedeva N. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2017. Vol. 48. No. 5. P. 682-697.

This article presents the results of empirical research on the relationship of motivation for ethno-cultural continuity (MEC) and strategies of acculturation among two generations of the Russian minority in Latvia. We sampled 107 Russian families (mothers: N = 107, age = 35-59, M = 42 years; late adolescents and youth: N = 107, age = 16-24, M = 17 years). The questionnaire included measures of motivation for ethno-cultural continuity, acculturation strategies, sociocultural adaptation, and self-esteem. A path model showed that motivation for ethno-cultural continuity, preference for assimilation, self-esteem, and sociocultural adaptation of mothers significantly related to those of their children. A motivation for ethno-cultural continuity of mothers predicted their preference for integration and self-esteem, while a motivation for ethno-cultural continuity of adolescents predicted their preference for separation. Preference for integration promoted better sociocultural adaptation and self-esteem in both generations. The results allowed consideration of the process of acculturation on the three interrelated levels: individual, family, and ethnic group, with the central role of the family, teaching younger generations to maintain heritage culture and successfully integrate in the larger society.

Added: May 10, 2017
Article
Van Osch Y. M., Breugelmans S. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2012. No. 43. P. 801-821.
Added: May 28, 2014
Article
Butovskaya M. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2017. Vol. 48. No. 4. P. 577-592.

Human spatial behavior has been the focus of hundreds of previous research studies. However, the conclusions and generalizability of previous studies on interpersonal distance preferences were limited by some important methodological and sampling issues. The objective of the present study was to compare preferred interpersonal distances across the world and to overcome the problems observed in previous studies. We present an extensive analysis of interpersonal distances over a large data set (N = 8,943 participants from 42 countries). We attempted to relate the preferred social, personal, and intimate distances observed in each country to a set of individual characteristics of the participants, and some attributes of their cultures. Our study indicates that individual characteristics (age and gender) influence interpersonal space preferences and that some variation in results can be explained by temperature in a given region. We also present objective values of preferred interpersonal distances in different regions, which might be used as a reference data point in future studies.

Added: Feb 19, 2018
Article
Rudnev M., Magun V., Schwartz S. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2018. Vol. 49. No. 8. P. 1165-1182.

The circular structure of basic human values is the core element of the Schwartz value theory. The structure demonstrated high robustness across cultures. However, the specific correlations between values and the differences in these correlations across countries have received little attention. The current research investigated the within-country correlations between the four higher order values. We estimated the correlations with meta-analytical mixed-effects models based on 10 surveys, on different value instruments, and on data from 104 countries. Analyses revealed theoretically expected negative relations between openness to change and conservation values and between self-transcendence and self-enhancement values. More interestingly, openness to change and self-transcendence values related negatively with each other, as did conservation and self-enhancement. Openness to change and self-enhancement values related predominantly positively, as did conservation and self-transcendence values. Correlations between the adjacent values were weaker in more economically developed countries, revealing higher value complexity of these societies. These findings were consistent across multiple surveys and after controlling for levels of education and income inequality. We concluded that, across most countries, values tend to be organized predominantly in line with the Social versus Person Focus opposition, whereas the Growth versus Self-Protection opposition is pronounced only in more economically developed countries.

Added: Jun 22, 2018
Article
Schwartz S. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2014. Vol. 45. No. 1. P. 5-13.
Added: Nov 18, 2013
Article
Sheldon K. M., Titova L., Gordeeva T. O. et al. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2017. Vol. 48. No. 5. P. 718-733.

Cultural stereotypes and considerable psychological research suggest that Russians are less happy and more stoic than Americans and Westerners. However, a second possibility is simply that cultural norms deter Russians from displaying happiness that they actually feel. To test this second possibility, three studies compared the emotional inhibition tendencies in U.S. and Russian student samples. Although Russians and Americans were no different on subjective well-being (SWB), a consistent 3-way interaction was found such that Russians (compared to Americans) reported greater inhibition of the expression of happiness (versus unhappiness), but mainly to strangers (versus friends/family). Russians also viewed their peers and countrymen as behaving similarly. Furthermore, a consistent interaction was found such that the degree of happiness inhibition with strangers was negatively correlated with SWB in the U.S. samples but was unrelated to SWB in the Russian samples. Given the equivalent levels of SWB observed in these data, we suggest that Russians may not be less happy than Americans, as this would illogically entail that they exaggerate their SWB reports while also claiming to inhibit their expression of happiness. Implications for emotion researchers and international relations are considered.

Added: Jan 30, 2017
Article
Schwartz S. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2013.
Added: Nov 18, 2013
Article
Schwartz S. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2014. Vol. 45. No. 1. P. 42-46.

The article is devoted to study of negativity bias and basic values.

Added: May 29, 2014
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