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Vinogradov A. Apocrypha. 2011. Vol. 22. P. 105-114.

The Apostle Andrew, which the New Testament mentions very sparingly, appears in the Acta Andreæ (2  half. II  c.) as a preacher of encratism, but in the Byzantine era these acts have been revised by removing the “heresy” and served as a statement of the cult of the apostle in Patras in the Peloponnese. In addition, the mention of Byzantion has been interpreted afterwards as the foundation of Constantinopolitan siege and updated by metropolitan legends. Andrew is also a hero of the apocryphal acts which show him together with the other apostles. Among these quite fantastic narratives, one must mention the Acts of Andrew and Matthias (beginning of the IV  c.). The action takes place along the southern Black Sea coast. Particular data from all these sources were compiled from the VI  c. in the so-called lists of the Apostles, and they in turn infl uenced Epiphanius the Monk, who wrote in 815-843 The Life of Andrew – a very singular text in the tradition of Apostles’ stories. This life, where the Apostle acts in the boundaries of the Byzantine Empire of IX  c., gave rise to a number of revisions in the IX-XI  cc. (Nicetas Paphlagonian, Simeon Metaphrastes, etc.), but also infl uenced the formation of the legends about Andrew’s preaching in Georgia and Russia. From the preacher of encratism he was at fi rst, Andrew became the Apostle of Byzantium and its world.

Added: Oct 23, 2012