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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 3
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Article
Alderman H., Lokshin M., Radyakin S. Economics and Human Biology. 2011. Vol. 9. No. 4. P. 393-406.

Data from three rounds of nationally representative health surveys in India (1992/93, 1998/99, and 2005/06) are used to assess the impact of selective mortality on children's anthropometrics. The nutritional status of the child population was simulated under the counterfactual scenario that all children who died in the first three years of life were alive at the time of measurement. The simulations demonstrate that the difference in anthropometrics due to selective mortality would be large only if there were very large differences in anthropometrics between the children who died and those who survived. Differences of this size are not substantiated by the research on the degree of association between mortality and malnutrition. The study shows that although mortality risk is higher among malnourished children, selective mortality has only a minor impact on the measured nutritional status of children stratified by gender.

Added: Oct 15, 2012
Article
Lazareva O. Economics and Human Biology. 2020. Vol. Vol. 36. P. 100823.

During the first years of the transition to the market economy in Russia, many people experienced the whole range of stressful labor market events, including job loss, wage cuts and nonpayments; some people had to change occupations or take on additional work. These events were caused externally by the unprecedented structural shifts in the economy. This natural experiment provides an opportunity to estimate the causal effect of various labor market shocks on individual health and health-related behaviors. Propensity score matching and difference-in-difference estimates using household survey data show that labor market shocks during the early transition had long-term negative effects on individual health. I also find an increased incidence of smoking and alcohol consumption as well as a higher risk of certain types of chronic health problems for the people affected by labor market shocks.

Added: Sep 30, 2019
Article
Nye J. V., Bruhanov M., Kochergina E. V. et al. Economics and Human Biology. 2017. Vol. 24. P. 43-60.

Is in utero exposure to testosterone correlated with earnings? The question matters for understanding determinants of wage differences that have attracted so much attention among economists in the past decade. Evidence indicates that markers for early testosterone exposure are correlated with traits like risk-taking and aggressiveness. But it is not at all clear how such findings might map into labor market success. We combine unique data from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey with measured markers (2D:4D ratios) for testosterone exposure and find that lower digit ratios (higher T) correlate with higher wages for women and for men, when controlling for age, education and occupation. There is also some evidence of a potential non-linear, inverse U-effect of digit ratios on wages but this is sensitive to choice of specification. These findings are consistent with earlier work on prenatal T and success in careers (Coates et al., 2009) but inconsistent with the work of Gielen et al. (2016) who find differing effects for men and women.

Added: Nov 28, 2016