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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 42
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Article
Magun V., Rudnev M., Schmidt P. Sociological Research. 2017. Vol. 56. No. 2. P. 149-180.

Research on social values of the Russian population usually is based on dominant or average values as reflected in public opinion surveys. The research reported in this article takes a different approach, looking not at averages but at how differences in values are distributed throughout the society. This shows a more complex picture, and one that is changing with each new generation.

Added: Oct 24, 2017
Article
Kozina I.M. Sociological Research. 1998. Vol. 37. No. 2. P. 50-63.
Added: Feb 9, 2015
Article
Leibovich O. L., Shushkova N. V. Sociological Research. 2007. Vol.  46. No. 1. P. 20-35.
Added: Feb 17, 2011
Article
Tikhonova N. E. Sociological Research. 2013. No. 52. P. 3-56.

Research on the normative values of Russians suggests that Russian society today has at least two varieties of the modern worldview. The standards, values, and attitudes not only differ quite substantially between them, but also differ from those generally associated with the Western version of "Modern Man." This makes it possible to say that in Russia an "alternative modernity" is taking shape, and that modernization in Russia is not proceeding along the lines of its Western form.

Added: Feb 19, 2014
Article
Zubarevich N. Sociological Research. 2012. No. 4. P. 3-27.

Cities as the Centers for the Modernizatuin of the Economy and Human Capital

Added: Oct 10, 2014
Article
Zinkina J., Korotayev A., Shulgin S. et al. Sociological Research. 2018. Vol. 57. No. 2. P. 112-122.

Russia’s fertility rate jumped after 2007, when new state measures were introduced to support families with children. This article analyzes the structure of this increase and factors that have contributed to a growth in the fertility rate. In 2007, the greatest gains were made in terms of second and subsequent births, while the fertility rate for first births has remained virtually unchanged. The effectiveness of demographic policy measures taken since early 2007 in regard to the fertility rate can be evaluated on the basis of statistical calculations as an additional amount of 0.259 of the total fertility rate, which amounts to 35.4 percent for second and subsequent births and 17.1 percent for all births. Thus, there are grounds to speak about positive shifts in fertility rate indicators not just for hypothetical generations, but also for real generations.

Added: May 2, 2019
Article
Shkaratan O. I. Sociological Research. 2012. Vol. 5. No. 3. P. 38-70.

The evolution of scientific views of the problem of social mobility illustrates the complexity of analyzing mobility in a context of social change, but also shows the societal benefits of a meritocratic principle of social selection.

Added: Mar 13, 2013
Article
Rebrov A. V. Sociological Research. 2014. Vol. 51. No. 2. P. 37-56.

A study of work motivations based on Gerchikov's typological model of motivation in Russian organizations shows that they are influenced by a wide array of factors in addition to wage levels, including place in the organization, career stage, the work environment, and the characteristics of the enterprise.

Added: Mar 1, 2016
Article
Rebrov A. V. Sociological Research. 2012. Vol. 51. No. 2. P. 37-56.

A study of work motivations based on Gerchikov's typological model of motivation in Russian organizations shows that they are influenced by a wide array of factors in addition to wage levels, including place in the organization, career stage, the work environment, and the characteristics of the enterprise.

Added: Mar 1, 2016
Article
Urnov M. Sociological Research. 1990. Vol. 29. No. 4. P. 6-31.

The spring elections of people's deputies of the USSR were perhaps the most important event in our political life since the Nineteenth Party Conference. For the first time in many decades we found ourselves in the role of real subjects of the political process, and thus began a transition from a purely theoretical study of democracy to its practical assimilation.

Added: Nov 8, 2012
Article
Назарова И. Б. Sociological research. 2008. № 2. С. 33-65.
Added: Sep 8, 2011
Article
Morgunova A. Sociological Research. 2014. Vol. 53. No. 3. P. 39-70.
Russia's population of migrants occupies an indistinct legal and social position in Russian society, and although they come overwhelmingly from former Soviet republics, attitudes toward them tend to be negative. Migrants are an important and useful component of the labor force in Russia, and will become more so in the future as the population gets older
Added: Dec 18, 2015
Article
Kosova L. Sociological Research. 2000. No. July-August . P. 67-74.
Added: May 7, 2010
Article
Anikin V. A., Tikhonova N. E. Sociological Research. 2016. Vol. 55. No. 5. P. 305-341.

This article uses a broad sample of statistical material to show that poverty and inequality have different natures in different BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa). Using various methods to concep- tualize the phenomenon of poverty, the authors are able to classify several types of poverty: preindustrial poverty in modern societies (India, South Africa), early industrial poverty of the lumpen urban poor (Brazil), industrial poverty (China, Russia), and late industrial poverty (Russia). They then draw a conclusion about the overriding heterogeneity of Russian poverty, which includes elements of all these models, but tends toward industrial poverty. They also indicate that the Russian inequality model does not dovetail with any of the inequality models described in this article. Finally, they note the particular relevance of investment, employment, migration, and tax policies to combating poverty “in a way appropriate to the Russian context.” 

Added: Jul 30, 2017
Article
Krasilnikova M., Владимировна N., Shishkin S. Sociological Research. 2009. Vol. 48. No. 3.
Added: Oct 28, 2010
Article
Kozina I., Vinogradova E. Sociological Research. 2013. Vol. 52. No. 1. P. 56-73.

Survey data on the attitudes of Russian workers to workplace relations show a low level of trust in existing institutions and arrangements for the resolution of conflicts. Workers do not see much basis for collective action, and tend to become withdrawn and resentful in the face of unresolved problems. This situation may result in greater intensity of conflict in the future if substantial and acceptable new, long-term arrangements are not developed.

Added: Jul 15, 2013
Article
Varshavskaia E. Sociological Research. 2017. Vol. 56. No. 6. P. 389-403.

The article analyzes the basic characteristics of Russian youth excluded from employment and education, known as NEET youth (NEET means “not in employment, education, or training”). Data from the 2014 Population Survey on Problems of Employment serve as the empirical basis. In Russia, one out of every eight young people aged 15 to 24 years is both unemployed and not in school. A low level of education and a lack of work experience are the basic factors significantly increasing an individual’s likelihood of belonging to the NEET group and extending the duration of any period of idleness. Young people with health problems form a special risk group that is almost completely excluded from employment and has extremely limited potential for receiving a professional education. The labor potential of economically inactive Russian NEET youth is low. Using ILO methodology, only one-tenth of young people in this group can be classified as members of the potential labor force.

Added: Feb 7, 2019
Article
N. E. Tikhonova. Sociological Research. 2017. Vol. 56. No. 1. P. 21-37.

This article examines the specific features of the “Russian dream” and some of its key elements using materials from a number of national studies conducted by the Institute of Sociology over the past several years. It highlights the cultural-civilizational features of the Russian dream and its connection with the values and identities of Russians. It will show that the presence of a dream is the norm for Russian culture in general, but that in recent years this norm has eroded. Although the Russian civilizational project with its characteristic “high dream” still exists, it is gradually losing its significance; instead, the dreams of a consumer society are transforming into dreams about ordinary survival.

Added: Apr 13, 2019
Article
Kozina I.M. Sociological Research. 2008. Vol. 47. No. 6. P. 76-90.
Added: Feb 9, 2015
Article
Lezhnina Y. P. Sociological Research. 2011. Vol. 50. No. 2. P. 13-31.

A survey investigating the risk of falling into poverty in Russia shows that after improvements in the level of well-being of the Russian population during the past decade, the situation has grown relatively worse during the current economic crisis and for the poor the situation will continue to worsen at an accelerated pace.

Added: Oct 10, 2012
Article
Tikhonova N. E. Sociological Research. 2011. Vol. 50. No. 1. P. 24-43.
Added: Jun 22, 2011
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