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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 3
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Article
Yakovlev A. A., Olga Balaeva, Tkachenko A. Journal of Public Procurement. 2018. Vol. 18. No. 1. P. 68-87.

Public procurement procedures prescribed by legislation not only enhance transparency and competition but also entail certain transaction costs for both customers and suppliers. These costs are important to the efficiency of the procurement system. However, very few previous studies have focused on estimating procurement costs. This paper proposes a methodology for public procurement cost evaluation. We show how procurement costs can be calculated using a formalized survey of public customers. This methodology was tested with a representative group of public customers operating in one region of the Russian Federation. We formulate the policy implications of our study as they relate to the improvement of public procurement regulations and argue that this methodological approach can be applied in other developing and transitioning economies.

Added: Jan 19, 2017
Article
Vinogradov D., Shadrina E. V., Kokareva L. Journal of Public Procurement. 2014. Vol. 14. No. 4. P. 538-566.

 ABSTRACT. Why do some countries (often developing and emerging

economies) adopt special laws on PPP, whilst in others PPPs are governed

by the legislation on public procurement and related bylaws? This paper

explains the above global discrepancies from an institutional perspective. In

a contract-theoretical framework we demonstrate how PPPs can enable

projects that are not feasible through standard public procurement

arrangements. Incentives for private partners are created through extra

benefits (often non-contractible) from their collaboration with the

government (e.g. risk reduction, reputational gains, access to additional

resources, lower bureaucratic burden, etc.). In a well-developed institutional

environment these benefits are implicitly guaranteed, suggesting no need in

a specialized PPP-enabling legislation. Otherwise, a PPP law should establish

an institutional architecture to provide the above benefits.

Added: Oct 3, 2014
Article
Demidova O., Yakovlev A. A. Journal of Public Procurement. 2012. Vol. 12. No. 4. P. 547-572.

In this paper, we regard public procurement as an instrument used by the government for indirect support of enterprises. In this context, we have investigated the place that public procurement occupy in statebusiness interrelations. Using data from a large survey of Russian manufacturing enterprises conducted in 2009 we show that in Russia public procurement cannot be regarded as a component in the system of exchanges, and the extent of combination between direct and indirect support depends on the level of government. At the federal level direct and indirect instruments of government support complement each other. At the regional and local levels the effect of mutual complementation can be observed only in relations with firms, which conceal information about their ownership structure and are supposedly affiliated with regional and local bureaucrats. In relations with other firms at regional and local levels direct and indirect support substitutes each other.

Added: Sep 11, 2012