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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 7
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Article
Choi B. H., Min B. I., Pelinovsky E. et al. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. 2012. Vol. 12. P. 1463-1467.

Data from a field survey of the 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami in the Sanriku area of Japan is used to plot the distribution function of runup heights along the coast. It is shown that the distribution function can be approximated by a theoretical log-normal curve. The characteristics of the distribution functions of the 2011 event are compared with data from two previous catastrophic tsunamis (1896 and 1933) that occurred in almost the same region. The number of observations during the last tsunami is very large, which provides an opportunity to revise the conception of the distribution of tsunami wave heights and the relationship between statistical characteristics and the number of observed runup heights suggested by Kajiura (1983) based on a small amount of data on previous tsunamis. The distribution function of the 2011 event demonstrates the sensitivity to the number of measurements (many of them cannot be considered independent measurements) and can be used to determine the characteristic scale of the coast, which corresponds to the statistical independence of observed wave heights.

Added: May 17, 2012
Article
Kurkina O. E., Talipova T. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. 2011. Vol. 11. No. 3. P. 981-986.

The generation of huge amplitude internal waves by the barotropic tide in the Barents Sea at high latitudes is examined using the numerical model of the Euler 2D equations for incompressible stratified fluid. The considered area is located between the Spitsbergen (Svalbard) Island and the Franz-VictoriaTrough as cross-section of 350 km length. There are two underwater hills of heights about 100 - 150 m on the background depth about 300 m. It is shown that intensive nonlinear internal waves with amplitudes up to 50 m and lengths about 6-12 km are generated in this zone. The total height of such waves is huge and they must be considered as a significant factor of the environment in this basin.

Added: Nov 23, 2012
Article
Pelinovsky E., Kharif C. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. 2011. Vol. 11. No. 7. P. 2043-2046.
Added: Nov 23, 2012
Article
Pelinovsky E., Didenkulova I., Mendez F. et al. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. 2013. Vol. 13. P. 1063-1067.

Sea hazards

Added: Nov 23, 2013
Article
Gurbatov S., Pelinovsky E. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. 2019. Vol. 19. P. 1925-1935.

The run-up of random long-wave ensemble (swell, storm surge, and tsunami) on the constant-slope beach is studied in the framework of the nonlinear shallow-water theory in the approximation of non-breaking waves. If the incident wave approaches the shore from the deepest water, run-up characteristics can be found in two stages: in the first stage, linear equations are solved and the wave characteristics at the fixed (undisturbed) shoreline are found, and in the second stage the nonlinear dynamics of the moving shoreline is studied by means of the Riemann (nonlinear) transformation of linear solutions. In this paper, detailed results are obtained for quasi-harmonic (narrow-band) waves with random amplitude and phase. It is shown that the probabilistic characteristics of the run-up extremes can be found from the linear theory, while the same ones of the moving shoreline are from the nonlinear theory. The role of wave-breaking due to large-amplitude outliers is discussed, so that it becomes necessary to consider wave ensembles with non-Gaussian statistics within the framework of the analytical theory of nonbreaking waves. The basic formulas for calculating the probabilistic characteristics of the moving shoreline and its velocity through the incident wave characteristics are given. They can be used for estimates of the flooding zone characteristics in marine natural hazards.

Added: Sep 17, 2019
Article
Ezersky A., Tiguercha1 D., Pelinovsky E. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. 2013. Vol. 13. No. 11. P. 2745-2752.

Run-up of long waves on a beach consisting of three pieces of constant but different slopes is studied. Linear shallow-water theory is used for incoming impulse evolution, and nonlinear corrections are obtained for the run-up stage. It is demonstrated that bottom profile influences the run-up characteristics and can lead to resonance effects: increase of wave height, particle velocity, and number of oscillations. Simple parameterization of tsunami source through an earthquake magnitude is used to calculate the run-up height versus earthquake magnitude. It is shown that resonance effects lead to the sufficient increase of run-up heights for the weakest earthquakes, and a tsunami wave does not break on chosen bottom relief if the earthquake magnitude does not exceed 7.8.

Added: Nov 13, 2013
Article
Pelinovsky E., Choi B., Kim K. et al. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. 2015. Vol. 15. No. 4. P. 747-755.
The tsunami generated on 12 July 1993 by the Hokkaido–Nansei–Oki earthquake (Mw D7.8) brought about a maximum wave run-up of 31.7 m, the highest recorded in Japan during the 20th century, near the Monai Valley on the west coast of Okushiri Island (Hokkaido Tsunami Survey Group, 1993). To reproduce the extreme run-up height, the three-dimensional non-hydrostatic model (Flow Science, 2012), referred to here as the NH-model, has been locally applied with open boundary conditions supplied in an offline manner by the three-dimensional hydrostatic model (Ribeiro et al., 2011), referred to here as the H-model. The area of the H-model is sufficiently large to cover the entire fault region with one-way nested multiple domains. For the initial water deformation, Okada’s fault model (1985) using the sub-fault parameters is applied. Three NH-model experiments have been performed, namely without islands, with one island and with two islands. The experiments with one island and with two islands give rise to values close to the observation with maximum runup heights of about 32.3 and 30.8 m, respectively, while the experiment without islands gives rise to about 25.2 m. The diffraction of the tsunami wave primarily by Muen Island, located in the south, and the southward topographic guiding of the tsunami run-up at the coast are, as in the laboratory simulation (Yoneyama et al., 2002), found to result in the extreme run-up height near Monai Valley. The presence of Hira Island enhances the diffraction of tsunami waves but its contribution to the extreme run-up height is marginal.
Added: Aug 4, 2015