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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 6
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Article
Gusejnov G. Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media. 2013. No. 9. P. 129-133.

In his book, Rowan Wilken, lecturer at the University of Swinburne, Australia, makes an attempt at providing a theoretical frame for a three-dimensional problem: the relation between new technologies, communities and places. His main goal is to sculpt an understanding of the relationship between place and community, both of which are transcended by what he calls 'teletechnologies' such as mobile phones, internet and their eventual derivatives. Looking for ‘productive theoretical possibilities to make sense of the complex interactions and interconnections between teletechnologies, place, and community’ appears to be a very difficult task.

Added: Mar 24, 2014
Article
Davydov Sergey Gennadyevich, Davydova M. A. Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media. 2013. № 10. С. 47-64.

This essay examnes the changing role of the amateur critic, the film fan who expends great effort to offer routine critiques of viewed films. It analyses 455 user generated texts from sites Afisha.ru and Kinopoisk.ru about the Russian movie Vysotskii. Thank God I’m Alive (2011). Six types of ordinary cinema reviews are described and discussed. Using a quantitative technique to analyse ordinary critical reviews, it unpacks the ways in which the roles of the amaeteur critic and professional critic are moving towards each other. The used technique is based on the allocation of topics presented in the corpus of texts, with the subsequent manual coding of these topics, and on cluster analysis (K-means method).

Added: Jan 23, 2014
Article
Lapina-Kratasyuk E., Chapman A., Goroshko O. et al. Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media. 2020. No. 20. P. 65-86.

Issue 20 celebrates ten years of Digital Icons. As an integral part of this celebratory issue we want to paint a broad picture of the changes Runet underwent in the last decade. In order to achieve this goal, we asked leading scholars in the field—among them most of the authors of Digital Icons 1—for short statements: Did Runet change in the past ten years, and if so, how? Has this change affected the academic or professional field in which you work? Did the field itself change? Have your methods and theories of study evolved? Based on the answers we received from Olena Goroshko, Tatjana Hofmann, Ekaterina Lapina-Kratasyuk, Sudha Rajagopalan, Ellen Rutten, Robert A. Saunders, Henrike Schmidt, Elena Trubina and Vera Zvereva, we compiled a panorama of ten years of Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media.

Added: Jun 12, 2020
Article
Samutina N. Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media. 2013. No. 10. P. 17-46.

The article examines Russian Harry Potter fan fiction as an anthropological source. The analysis focuses on fan fiction as a cultural practice, Russian online communities devoted to the continuation of Harry Potter stories and their common values, reading strategies and practices of writing. Given that Russian Harry Potter fan fiction writers and readers are mostly women, the author pays attention to gender norms as they are represented in fan fiction texts and reading practices. The article explores the central role that individual choice plays in fan fiction axiology, the representations of sex and corresponding problems of the language, the images of family which are produced and discussed in the community and the possibilities that slash as a fictional frame provides for the manifestation of the community’s essential values.

Added: May 11, 2013
Article
Baysha O. Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media. 2010. Vol. 4.

This study investigates the outburst of anti-Americanism among Russian Internet users during the Russia-Georgia military crisis of 2008. The paper analyzes the discussions of Washington Post articles at the Washington Post Internet forum and the Foreign Media Russian Internet site. This study shows that, despite numerous attempts by Russian users to deliver their messages to the American readers, their postings were ignored by the American users and global dialogue did not occur. It is this exclusion from the conversation, together with the denigration of Russia by writers in the United States that led to the intensification of anti-American sentiments among the Russians. The study makes clear that for the establishment of effective global public spheres access to new communication technologies and knowledge of English are inadequate, unless accompanied by the willingness to listen to others and a desire to understand them.

Added: Nov 11, 2013
Article
Ним Е. Г. Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian and Central European New Media. 2012. № 7. С. 171-180.

‘Nanodemonstrations’ first became part of the Russian protest campaign for fair elections in 2012. Originating in the northern town of Apatity, a wave of ‘doll protests’ – demonstrations and other citizen actions which were staged by using lego dolls and soft toys – swept over many Russian cities. These protests were planned as media events; the opposition has used new media in their organization.

Added: Sep 18, 2014