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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 7
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Article
Kostinskiy A., Andreev M., Rakov V. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES. 2018. Vol. 123. No. 10. P. 5360-5375.

Properties of positive and negative leaders developing in air gaps ranging from 4 to 10 m that were subjected to 100/7,500-μs voltage impulses were examined using a two-frame, high-speed video camera with image enhancement. Abrupt extension (stepping) that culminated in a bright and structured corona streamer burst was observed for both negative (expected for the “classical” stepping process) and positive (expected for the so-called restrike process) leaders. Selected high-quality images of five negative and four positive leaders with pronounced corona streamer bursts are presented here. The morphology of corona streamer bursts was essentially independent of polarity. Streamer bursts exhibiting nearly spherical symmetry were observed. For the four positive leaders, the newly added channel sections (steps) were almost straight and had lengths ranging from about 50 to over 120 cm. For the five negative leaders, most of the steps were curved and their 2-D lengths were some tens of centimeters. It is generally thought that positive leaders in both long sparks and lightning extend continuously or exhibit optically unresolvable steps whose length is comparable to the leader tip size (1 cm or less) and that for sparks only when the absolute humidity is relatively high (>10 g/m3 or so) or voltage rise time is relatively long (around 1 ms or more) can larger steps occur. In this study, both modes of propagation for different branches of the same positive leader were observed.

Added: Nov 8, 2020
Article
Zhu Y., Rakov V., Tran M. et al. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES. 2018. Vol. 123. No. 18. P. 10260-10277.

The lumped voltage source model proposed by Baba and Rakov (2005b, https://doi.org/10.1029/2004JD005202) for studying the interaction of lightning with tall objects was used to examine the origin of earlier zero crossings observed in electric field signatures produced by lightning strikes to towers. Different return stroke models of transmission line type were used, and model parameters were varied in wide ranges. Lightning channel was assumed to be straight and vertical. It was found that the observed narrow field signatures cannot be reproduced by traditional models and require a narrower input current waveform or/and its faster decay with height. Contribution to the total electric field peak from a tower whose height exceeds 100 m or so is greater than that from the lightning channel. At distances of 2 to 50 km, the electric field signature due to the tower current was found to be bipolar, while that due to the lightning channel current was unipolar. The narrow bipolar electric field waveforms produced by lightning striking the 257-m tower in Florida were reproduced using two approaches. In the first one, we employed as input a typical channel base current waveform and the transmission line with exponential current decay with height model with a very small decay height constant. In the second approach, we used a narrow pulse followed by a steady-level tail as the input current waveform and the transmission line with linear current decay with height model. In both approaches, the computed electric field waveforms matched well the corresponding measured waveforms, at least for the initial half-cycle and opposite polarity overshoot.

Added: Nov 20, 2020
Article
Azadifar M., Rubinstein M., Li Q. et al. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES. 2019. Vol. 124. No. 24. P. 14008-14023.

We present a new engineering model for the M component mode of charge transfer to ground that can predict the observed electric field signatures associated with this process at various distances, including (a) the microsecond-scale pulse thought to be due to the junction of in-cloud leaders and the grounded, current-carrying channel and (b) the ensuing slow, millisecond-scale pulse due to the M component proper occurring below the junction point. We examine the features of 13 microsecond-scale, fast electric field pulses associated with M component processes in upward negative lightning initiated from the Santis Tower and recorded 14.7 km from it. Eleven out of the 13 pulses were found to be unipolar with pulse widths in the range of 9.8 to 35 mu s, and the other two were bipolar. To model the process that gives rise to microsecond-scale pulses, we hypothesize that the current pulses propagating away from the junction point along the main lightning channel (below the junction point) and along the feeding in-cloud leader channel (branch) carry the same amount of charge. We further assume that the pulse traversing the branch is similar to a subsequent return-stroke (RS) pulse. In the model, the RS-like process is represented by the MTLE model. The millisecond-scale field signature that follows the initial fast pulse in M components at close distances is simulated in our model using the guided-wave M component model. The proposed model successfully reproduces the vertical electric field waveforms associated with M-component processes in upward lightning flashes initiated from the Santis Tower at 14.7-km distance from the lightning channel, in which both the fast, microsecond-scale and the following slower, millisecond-scale pulses were observed. The model also reasonably reproduces the known features of electric field signatures at close distances (up to 5 km), where the amplitude of the millisecond-scale hook-like pulse is much larger than that of the microsecond-scale pulse, and at far distances (of the order of 100 km), where the microsecond-scale pulses are dominant.  

Added: Nov 20, 2020
Article
Kostinskiy A., Rakov V. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES. 2020. Vol. 125. No. 11.

The streamer zone of positive leader during the breakthrough phase of long sparks was experimentally investigated with two methods. One of the methods is the analysis of streamer‐zone images obtained with a high‐speed framing camera with image enhancement. This method allowed us to estimate the spatial distribution of streamer density and low‐frequency conductivity in the streamer zone. The other method is the microwave probing, which we applied for the first time to long sparks. The attenuation of microwave beam in the streamer zone in our experiments is proportional to the total number of free electrons inside the microwave beam. Experimental data on the microwave attenuation combined with the streamer density found using the first method allowed us to estimate the total number of free electrons in one streamer. The following parameters were obtained. The streamer density in the center of the streamer zone is (0.6–1)·10^5m^−3, and the total number of streamers in the streamer zone is 4·10^5–10^6. The average total number of free electrons in one streamer is about 3·10^10. Low‐frequency conductivity on the axis of streamer zone was estimated to be typically 2·10^−5 S/m, which is similar to that estimated for corona sheath in lightning. Both methods are based on the assumption of constancy of electric field and similarity of all streamers inside the streamer zone. The overall results of this study are generally consistent with this assumption.

Added: Nov 8, 2020
Article
Kostinskiy A., Syssoev V. S., Bogatov N. et al. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES. 2015. Vol. 120. No. 20. P. 10728-10735.

Detailed infrared (2.7–5.5 μm) images of bidirectional leaders produced by the cloud of small (typical radius of 0.5 μm), positively charged water droplets are presented. The leader was composed of the downward extending positive part and the upward extending negative part, these two parts (both branched, although in different ways) being connected by the single-channel middle part. The downward extending part included the tortuous positive leader channel (similar to its upward extending counterpart observed when the cloud polarity was negative) that was often accompanied by much less tortuous but often equally bright downward extending plasma formations of unknown nature. Very faint positive streamer zone was also observed. Either the positive leader channel or the unusual plasma formation (UPF) can come in contact with the grounded plane. The upward extending part is associated with a large network of faint channels, mostly fanning out of the upper part of the usually much brighter leader channel and apparently pervading the entire upper part of the cloud. Some of those faint channels could be unusually long and bright negative streamers, while others could be similar to UPFs. The IR luminosity along the brightest part of the bidirectional leader channel is often nonuniform. Some variations in channel brightness are localized and suggest the involvement of space leader-type processes at multiple positions along the channel, changes in channel orientation, or variations in channel radius.

Added: Dec 18, 2015
Article
Kostinskiy A., Syssoev V., Bogatov N. et al. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES. 2016. Vol. 121. No. 16. P. 9756-9766.

Detailed observations of the connection between positive and negative leaders in meter-scale electric discharges generated by clouds of negatively charged water droplets are presented, and their possible implications for the attachment process in lightning are discussed. Optical images obtained with three different high-speed cameras (visible range with image enhancement, visible-range regular, and infrared) and corresponding current recordings were used. Two snapshots of the breakthrough phase of the leader connection, showing significant leader branching inside the common streamer zone, are presented for the first time. Positive and negative leader speeds inside the common streamer zone for two events were found to be similar. Higher leader speeds were generally associated with higher leader currents. In the case of head-to-head leader connection, the infrared brightness of the junction region (probably representing the gas temperature and, hence, the energy input) was typically a factor of 5 or so higher than for channel sections either below or above that region. In 16% of cases, the downward negative leader connected to the upward positive leader below its tip (attached to the lateral surface of the positive leader), with the connection being accomplished via a channel segment that appeared to be perpendicular to one or both of the leader channels.

Added: Oct 29, 2016
Article
Kostinskiy A. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES. 2020. Vol. 125. No. 22. P. e2020JD033191.

Based on experimental results of recent years, this article presents a qualitative description of a possible mechanism (termed the Mechanism) covering the main stages of lightning initiation, starting before and including the initiating event, followed by the initial electric field change (IEC), followed by the first few initial breakdown pulses (IBPs). The Mechanism assumes initiation occurs in a region of ~1 km^3 with average electric field E>0.3 MV/(m∙atm), which contains, because of turbulence, numerous small “Eth-volumes” of ~10^-4-10^-3 m^3 with E≥3 MV/(m∙atm). The Mechanism allows for lightning initiation by either of two observed types of events: a high power VHF event such as a Narrow Bipolar Event, or a weak VHF event. According to theMechanism, both types of initiating events are caused by a group of relativistic runaway electron avalanche particles (where the initial electrons are secondary particles of an extensive air shower) passing through many Eth-volumes, thereby causing the nearly simultaneous launching of many positive streamer flashes. Due to ionization-heating instability, unusual plasma formations (UPFs) appear along the streamers’ trajectories. These UPFs combine into three-dimensional (3D) networks of hot plasma channels during the IEC, resulting in its observed weak current flow. The subsequent development and combination of two (or more) of these 3D networks of hot plasma channels then causes the first IBP. Each subsequent IBP is caused when another 3D network of hot plasma channels combines with the chain of networks caused by earlier IBPs.

Added: Nov 8, 2020