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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 28
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Article
Radina N. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2016. Vol. 8. No. 1. P. 67-79.

This article is to analyze the image of a provincial Russian town in the communicative context – for the insiders and the outsiders. This analysis helps to manage the town’s brand and to evaluate the tourist potential of the location. The research is based on integrating qualitative and quantitative approaches. The image of the territory (which forms the brand’s basis) was reconstructed through the qualitative and quantitative content-analysis of 515 unstructured focused interviews with the citizens of minor towns. The residents of a provincial Russian town form its image predominantly through nature (rivers, forests, the opportunities for hunting and fishing, etc.). The image of the town for the insiders (focused on the nature) varies considerably from the version for the others/ the outsiders (where the town’s nature, history and culture are integrated). So the town’s branding for inner tourism may vary considerably from the brand aimed at international tourism.

Added: Dec 8, 2015
Article
Demin M. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2014. Vol. 1. No. 6. P. 99-105.

A report on the conference “Academic Journals: The Organization of Scholarship and the Broadcasting of Knowledge” (15–17 March 2013; Higher School of Economics [HSE], St. Petersburg campus)

Added: Mar 18, 2014
Article
Ostrovskaya E., Zemskova E. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2016. Vol. 8. No. 3. P. 217-229.

The article focuses on the history of the English version of Internatsionalnaya LiteraturaInternational Literature, addressing different aspects of the institutional history of the magazine over the 1930s. The magazine is discussed as a mouthpiece of IURW (International Union of Revolutionary Writers), so the published and (newly revealed) archival materials are used to show the connection and, more importantly the difference between the two institutions, presented by more or less the same set of people. Another perspective is introduced by the editorial correspondence with the readers from Britain. The institutes under consideration are discussed as both cultural and political entities and analyzed from these two perspectives.

Added: Mar 18, 2015
Article
Kouprianov A. V. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2014. Vol. 6. No. 1. P. 52-66.

A bibliometric crisis is defined as a more or less marked decline of basic bibliometric indicators interrupting a preceding period of stable growth or stagnation. The crises of 1930–1931 and 1941–1942 revealed from the previous studies (Kozhevnikov & Petrosova, 1991) were analysed in depth on the basis of the data on the publication of biological serials in USSR from 1917 through 1949 and a set of more detailed data on selected journals covering the period from 1921 through 1958. It is shown that even though the scale of decline of 1930–1931 was comparable to that of 1941–1942, the fine structure of the two crises and their impact on the continuity of the corpus of biological serials were different. The application of the logistic growth model to the analysis of publication of scholarly serials is discussed. It is argued that, for the purposes of our analysis, momentary data are more indicative than cumulative ones.

Added: Dec 13, 2013
Article
Khitrov A. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2010. Vol. 3. No. 3/4. P. 313-315.
Added: Mar 26, 2015
Article
Akopov S. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2015. Vol. 7. No. 1. P. 136-138.

Book Review. Cultures of power in post-communist Russia: an analysis of elite political discourse: Russia and Europe: building bridges, digging trenches (Routledge Contemporary Russia and Eastern Europe)

Added: Mar 11, 2016
Article
Dovbysh O. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2019.

Traditionally, regional mass media has been the least-studied component of the Russian media system; however, beginning from the 2000s, transformations in the nation's political and economic spheres have influenced the position of local media. This paper provides a deeper investigation of the processes and patterns underlying the development of regional mass media in modern Russia. The research is grounded on an analytical review of secondary sources, which is supported by 14 in-depth interviews with media professionals from 5 regions in Russia. The results reveal that Russia's regional media outlets operate both as commercial actors and public service actors. This duality is rooted in several multidirectional and controversial changes in the nation's economic and political systems, as well as in a journalist culture which causes media outlets to have a vague understanding of their places and functions in society.

Added: Oct 5, 2018
Article
Olga Logunova. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2017. Vol. 9. No. 3. P. 303-304.

In 2015-2016 the Department of Communication, Media and Design of the National Research University “Higher School of Economics” in collaboration with non-profit organization ROCIT conducted research aimed to construct the Index of Digital Literacy in Russian Regions.  This research was the priority and remain unmatched for the momentIn 2015-2016 the Department of Communication, Media and Design of the National Research University “Higher School of Economics” in collaboration with non-profit organization ROCIT conducted research aimed to construct the Index of Digital Literacy in Russian Regions.  This research was the priority and remain unmatched for the moment

Added: Oct 14, 2017
Article
Tulchinsky G. L. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2013. Vol. 5. No. 3. P. 244-251.

http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rrjc20

Added: Nov 23, 2013
Article
Gusejnov G. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2018. Vol. 10. No. 1. P. 1-8.

Since the late 1980s, we witnessed vigorous attempts to bury the Soviet intelligentsia along with Soviet literature. Some efforts along these lines were truly inspired (Anninsky, 1992Anninsky, L. (1992). The suppression of the intelligentsia. Will it persist till 2000? [Vytesnenia intelligentsia. Will it persists till 2000?]. Ogonek, № 29-30, pp. 28–29. [Google Scholar]; Yampolsky, 1991Yampolsky, M. (1991). Rape by confession [Iznasilovanny pokaianiem]. Literaturnoe obozrenie8, 89–96. [Google Scholar]). And yet, forecasts about the imminent demise of Russian intelligentsia have proved premature. Plenty of people still identify themselves with this vaunted group. Some go out of their way to sell their services to the official authorities, to Vladimir Putin – the surprising monarch that emerged after breakup of the Soviet Union. Others, still in self-criticism mode, agitate against the reigning powers and official establishment or sport a decidedly apolitical attitude. Then there are those who enjoy a cozy relationship with the establishment and milk it to their advantage.

Structurally, the situation uncannily resembles the one that prevailed in the Soviet era. The notion that the intelligenty will transform themselves into pragmatic intellectuals – a common assumption in the 1990s – didn’t pan out (Kordonsky, 1994Kordonsky, S. (1994). Intelligentsia as a national elite[Intelligentsia v roli nationalnoi elity]. Predely vlasti1, 134–152). The intelligentsia is still very much with us, even though it has adapted to the circumstances.

Added: Nov 1, 2018
Article
Akopov S., Асланян К. А., Slyusarchuk P. A. et al. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2017. Vol. 9. No. 1. P. 1-18.

This article couples framing analyses with social identity issues to provide a critical discourse analysis of the Sochi Olympics opening ceremony, along with the various media depictions surrounding it. Moreover, it explores the idea of 'derzhava' as a rediscovered political narrative/frame in Russian symbolic politics. We argue that images and symbols alluding to different events in the past and present play significant roles in the social construction of people’s identities. Our lives are largely dependent upon what we tend to forget, and what we still remember. As the first impressions of the Sochi Olympics Games pass away, we are finally able to see what stayed hidden, and what was deliberately left in light. Relying upon the research on the connection between collective memory and social identity, we examine several Sochi Olympics events, seeking to identify what the organizers of the Games wanted us to remember, and what was meant to be forgotten. What symbols and signs were deliberately and repeatedly manifested to evoke Russian national pride? What was left behind the scenes in order not to revive traumatic collective memory of the past? An analysis of two frames – “the frame of commemoration” and “the frame of obliteration” - helps to shed light on the veiled elements of new Russian social identity construction today. In addition, our analysis helps to explain how the Sochi Olympics became a springboard for launching a more forceful symbolic politics commensurate with new Russian power ambitions.

 

Added: Dec 19, 2017
Article
Veksler A. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2017. Vol. 9. No. 1. P. 103-105.
Added: Apr 26, 2017
Article
Schnittke E. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2009. Vol. 1. No. 5. P. 105-130.
Added: Oct 28, 2014
Article
Radina N. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2018. Vol. 10. No. 1. P. 38-53.

This study based on the use of methods of corpus linguistics compares literary and “naive autobiographies” of men and women. The empirical material of this research is represented by texts of autobiographies of men from provincial Russia, the corpus of “naive” male autobiographies comprises 36 interviews (28 335 word usages). For the comparative analysis 46 female autobiographies have been used (the total corpus contains 48.530 word usages) dwelling in the countryside and provincial towns as well. The other group of materials includes 20 “literary autobiographies” of writers (the corpus of literary male autobiographies contains 27 241 word usages). It was found that the autobiographies of writers, as well as the autobiographies of “ordinary males”, are being constructed by the authors within the boundaries of the “male culture” rules regardless of abilities and literary experiences.

Added: Oct 26, 2017
Article
Novikova A. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2010. No. 3/4. P. 281-295.

The article demonstrates how over the past two decades Russian television has changed its interpretation of the Soviet Past and used myths of the Soviet period in order to shape a new collective identity. The author analyses popular Russian television programs (i.e. those that are broadcast by Russian state channels and have high rating). She argues that the consequences of a cultural trauma (the collapse of the USSR) have not been overcome and that Russian television offers its viewers models of everyday life that do not promote modernization or successful nation building.

Added: Nov 19, 2013
Article
Kiriya I. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2019. P. 1-16.

In this paper, we propose an alternative approach to analysing the current duality of the Russian media system, which for a long time was regarded as transitional. We propose to interpret the current Russian media system in terms of institutional conflict between norms, which were artificially implemented and the grounded informal rules embodied in everyday practices both from market agents and audiences. Mainly implemented after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the norms were based on a neo-liberal representation of the media system, involving financial independence of the media from the state, a ‘news culture’ instead of a ‘propaganda culture’ and so on. At the same time, the informal rules were based on the paternalistic role of the state, the accessibility tradition and the fragmentation of the public sphere. The interaction of such elements forms the dualist or ‘uncertain’ character of the media system.

Added: Feb 5, 2019
Article
Davydov S. G. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2017. Vol. 9. No. 3. P. 322-327.

In 2016 the fourth volume in the series ‘Online research in Russia’ was published. The concept of the series remains unchanged from year to year. Editors are trying to involve the broadest possible range of authors conducting online research in Russia. The range of topics covered is quite broad. It includes survey methodologies based on access panels, alternative methods of online sampling, qualitative online research, digital ethnography, big data analysis, and so on. In addition, the book includes translations of important foreign publications on the methodology of online research important for the Russian research community. Some of them are written especially for this edition.

Added: Jan 16, 2018
Article
Shteinman M. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2010. Vol. 3. No. 1/2. P. 147-152.

The rewiew focuses on Natalia Avtonomova's book "Open structure: Jakobson-Bakhtin-LotmanGasparov" (2009)

Added: Jul 16, 2018
Article
Tulchinsky G. L. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2015. Vol. 7. No. 1. P. 112-115.
Both Russian and Soviet cultures have commonly been both imperial and eclectic in nature. We should indeed distinguish between two levels of Russian culture: the first, or grassroots culture, contains at least 10–12 Russian ethnic groups, with substantial differences between each group; and the second, upper, level of elite culture (the city of culture) includes a French classical ballet, Italian opera, Viennese operetta, and so on. This second culture developed primarily as a response to, and reception of, European cultures: in this sense, this second group can be considered the most postmodern.
Added: Jan 17, 2016
Article
Pilgun M. A. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2014. Vol. 6. No. 3. P. 207-208.
Russian Life Lived and Communicated” panel at the International Communication Association (ICA) conference “Communication and ‘The Good Life’”, 22–26 May, Seattle, USA
Added: Oct 7, 2014
Article
Tulchinsky G. L. The Russian Journal of Communication. 2017. Vol. 9. No. 3. P. 297-298.

But, the main thing is the ambiguous consequences of such marketization, including political communication and morality. This is a paradoxical situation. The growth of the amount and availability of information is accompanied by a divergence in society. Thanks to social networks, online self-sufficient communities are formed, the members of which are husking each other, fighting for the purity of rank and showing aggressiveness toward other communities. Society is increasingly turning into a realization of the movie ‘Matrix’: scattered cocoons which generate online maya (visible lows) of offline social and political life.

Added: Jan 11, 2018
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