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Of all publications in the section: 2
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Article
Ermolova M. D., Leonidov A., Nechitailo V. et al. Journal of Simulation. 2021. Vol. 15. No. 1-2. P. 82-92.

The Basel III regulation raised the minimum capital requirements for banks. However, its implementation may not have reduced systemic risks. Academicians investigating optimal banking regulations do not have a consensus on whether to increase or decrease capital requirements. Here, we use the agent-based approach to study capital regulation and its implications on the evolution of the banking system. We chose the Russian banking system to proxy key model parameters. We find that lower capital requirements imply higher financial stability than the Basel III regime, where the regulator requires banks to have capital over 10% of its risk-weighted assets’ amount. However, the regulatory rule to merely have a non-negative capital is the simplest solution that best fits heterogeneous economies. It produces the highest ratio of capital to assets, the least number of bank bankruptcies, and the lowest demand of banks to enter the interbank market to cover liquidity problems for all systems.

Added: Jun 26, 2020
Article
Khabibullin R. A., Ponomarenko A., Seleznev S. Journal of Simulation. 2020. P. 1-14.

We develop a stock-flow-consistent microsimulation model that comprises all relevant mechanisms of money creation and parametrize it to fit actual data. The model is used to make out-of-sample projections of broad money and credit developments under the commencement/termination of foreign reserve accumulation by the Bank of Russia. We use direct forecasts from the microsimulation model as well as the two-step approach, which implies the use of artificial data to pre-train the Bayesian vector autoregression model. We conclude that the suggested approach is competitive in forecasting and yields promising results.

Added: Dec 17, 2020