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Of all publications in the section: 4
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Article
Hellman L., Agafonov L., Ljungqvist F. et al. Environmental Research Letters. 2016. Vol. 11. No. 7. P. 074021-1-074021-13.

The area covered by boreal forests accounts for ∼16%of the global and 22% of theNorthern Hemisphere landmass. Changes in the productivity and functioning of this circumpolar biome not only have strong effects on species composition and diversity at regional to larger scales, but also on the Earth’s carbon cycle. Although temporal inconsistency in the response of tree growth to temperature has been reported from some locations at the higher northern latitudes, a systematic dendroecological network assessment is stillmissing formost of the boreal zone.Here, we analyze the geographical patterns of changes in summer temperature and precipitation across northern Eurasia>60 °Nsince 1951 AD, aswell as the growth trends and climate responses of 445 Pinus, Larix and Picea ring width chronologies in the same area and period. In contrast to widespread summer warming, fluctuations in precipitation and tree growth are spatially more diverse and overall less distinct. Although the influence of summer temperature on ring formation is increasing with latitude and distinctmoisture effects are restricted to a fewsouthern locations, growth sensitivity to June–July temperature variability is only significant at 16.6% of all sites (p„0.01). By revealing complex climate constraints on the productivity of Eurasia’s northern forests, our results question the a priori suitability of boreal tree-ring width chronologies for reconstructing summer temperatures. This study further emphasizes regional climate differences and their role on the dynamics of boreal ecosystems, and also underlines the importance of free data access to facilitate the compilation and evaluation ofmassively replicated and updated dendroecological networks.

Added: Nov 1, 2019
Article
Morgunov B. Environmental Research Letters. 2018. Vol. 13. No. 6. P. 1-13.

Throughout the Euro-Arctic region of Russia (Murmansk region), there is a substantial increase of metal concentrations in water, which are related to local discharges from the metallurgical and mining industry, transboundary pollution, as well as indirect leaching of elements by acid precipitation. This study collates data to investigate the relationship between surface water contamination by metals, and fish and human health. Fish are used as a biological indicator to show the impact of water pollution by metals on the ecosystem's health. The etiology of fish and human diseases are related to the water pollution and accumulation of metals in organisms. High concentrations of Ni and Cd in water drives an accumulation of these elements in organs and tissues of fish, especially in kidneys. The relation between the accumulation of Ni in kidneys and the development of fish nephrocalcinosis and fibroelastosis was established. Statistical analysis demonstrated that human populations in cities close in proximity to smelters show the highest incidence of disease. The results of histological, clinical, and post-mortem examination of patients shows the highest content of toxic metals, especially Cd, in livers and kidneys. Our complex investigation of a set of disorders observed in fish and human populations indicates that there is a high probability that the negative impact on human health is caused by prolonged water contamination by heavy metals. As a novel finding, this paper shows that based on the similarity of pathological processes and bioaccumulation of metals in fish and humans, examining the content of heavy metals in fish can be used to confirm etiology and evaluate the potential risk to human health by pollution of surface waters.

Added: Nov 7, 2018
Article
Luterbacher J., Werner J., Smerdon J. et al. Environmental Research Letters. 2016. No. 11. P. 024001-1-024001-12.

The spatial context is critical when assessing present-day climate anomalies, attributing them to potential forcings and making statements regarding their frequency and severity in a long-term perspective. Recent international initiatives have expanded the number of high-quality proxy-records and developed new statistical reconstruction methods. These advances allow more rigorous regional past temperature reconstructions and, in turn, the possibility of evaluating climate models on policy-relevant, spatio-temporal scales. Here we provide a new proxy-based, annually-resolved, spatial reconstruction of the European summer (June–August) temperature fields back to 755 CE based on Bayesian hierarchical modelling (BHM), together with estimates of the European mean temperature variation since 138 BCE based on BHM and composite-plus-scaling (CPS). Our reconstructions compare well with independent instrumental and proxy-based temperature estimates, but suggest a larger amplitude in summer temperature variability than previously reported. Both CPS and BHM reconstructions indicate that the mean 20th century European summer temperature was not significantly different from some earlier centuries, including the 1st, 2nd, 8th and 10th centuries CE. The 1st century (in BHM also the 10th century) may even have been slightly warmer than the 20th century, but the difference is not statistically significant. Comparing each 50 yr period with the 1951–2000 period reveals a similar pattern. Recent summers, however, have been unusually warm in the context of the last two millennia and there are no 30 yr periods in either reconstruction that exceed the mean average European summer temperature of the last 3 decades (1986–2015 CE). A comparison with an ensemble of climate model simulations suggests that the reconstructed European summer temperature variability over the period 850–2000 CE reflects changes in both internal variability and external forcing on multi-decadal time-scales. For pan-European temperatures we find slightly better agreement between the reconstruction and the model simulations with high-end estimates for total solar irradiance. Temperature differences between the medieval period, the recent period and the Little Ice Age are larger in the reconstructions than the simulations. This may indicate inflated variability of the reconstructions, a lack of sensitivity and processes to changes in external forcing on the simulated European climate and/or an underestimation of internal variability on centennial and longer time scales.

Added: Nov 1, 2019
Article
Ljungqvist F., Seim A., Krusic P. et al. Environmental Research Letters. 2019. Vol. 14. No. 8. P. 084015-1-084015-15.

The long-term relationship between temperature and hydroclimate has remained uncertain due to the short length of instrumental measurements and inconsistent results from climate model simulations. This lack of understanding is particularly critical with regard to projected drought and flood risks. Here we assess warm-season co-variability patterns between temperature and hydroclimate over Europe back to 850 CE using instrumental measurements, tree-ring based reconstructions, and climate model simulations. We find that the temperature–hydroclimate relationship in both the instrumental and reconstructed data turns more positive at lower frequencies, but less so in model simulations, with a dipole emerging between positive (warm and wet) and negative (warm and dry) associations in northern and southern Europe, respectively. Compared to instrumental data, models reveal a more negative co-variability across all timescales, while reconstructions exhibit a more positive co-variability. Despite the observed differences in the temperature–hydroclimate co-variability patterns in instrumental, reconstructed and model simulated data, we find that all data types share relatively similar phase-relationships between temperature and hydroclimate, indicating the common influence of external forcing. The co-variability between temperature and soil moisture in the model simulations is overestimated, implying a possible overestimation of temperature-driven future drought risks.

Added: Oct 23, 2019