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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 7
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Article
Klimova S. Slavistična revija. 2015. Vol. 63. No. 4. P. 363-376.

The article is devoted to war and peace, which are the fundamental images in Leo Tolstoy’s novel Hadji-Murad. They are analyzed through the prism of the Greek concept of “polemos” (war). This concept includes war and peace not as a binary opposition, but as a holistic and dialogical unity. Polemos discovers the conceptual image of war that includes peace as its essential “other”. The special attention is paid to the ideological, national, and ressentiment (ethical) aspects of the problem of war and peace, repression and resistance.

Added: Feb 14, 2016
Article
Скачедубова М. В. Slavisticna Revija. 2017. № 1. С. 115-125.

The article analyzes instances of verbal l-forms used without auxiliary in Old Russian Hypatian Chronicle (13th–15th c.). Special emphasis is on the contexts where l-forms do not convey the meaning of the perfect tense. One part consists of contexts that are typical for participle predications. The other part consists of examples where the l-forms appear in typical participle contexts of the vstavъ (i) reče type. All examples where l-forms do not have the meaning of the perfect tense can be attributed either to the first or to the second group. Taking this into account, as well as the material from the dialects and other Slavic languages that include, to varying extent, adjectives going back to l-participles, it seems reasonable to assume that l-forms could function not only as a part of the compound verbal predicate, but also as a past participle -ъš-/-vъš-.

Added: Oct 3, 2018
Article
Успенский П. Ф. Slavisticna Revija. 2017. № 1. С. 151-167.

Notes of a Cavalryman (Zapiski kavalerista, 1915–1916) by Nikolai Gumilev are dedicated to the poet’s participation in World War I and reveal a deep influence of Tolstoy’s novel War and Peace. A brief analysis of the work leads to the conclusion that Gumilev on a superficial level often argued with Tolstoy’s concept of war. Nevertheless, on a deeper level he took cues from Nikolai Rostov not only by getting in the same situations as Tolstoy’s hero, but also by resembling Rostov’s psychological type. This consequently allows us to claim that during World War I, Nikolai Rostov was a model according to which Gumilev fashioned his own life.

Added: Mar 15, 2017
Article
Бочкарев А. Е. Slavisticna Revija. 2017. Т. 63. № 3. С. 537-550.

This publication explores the ways of displaying the concept of pride in the Russian language image of the world. According to the National Corpus of Russian language the meanings of pride vary together with the axiologi-cal norms and might be associated in different contexts with a town, a country, people, cucumbers, a wife, an army, or even a mobile phone. The predicates applicable to pride vary with its’ position in the syntactic structure. As a semantic object, pride is felt, shared and hidden, as a semantic subject it attacks and covers. In the metaphoric mapping pride is defined in relation to a hostile force, beast or liquid. By analogy with a hostile force it covers, possesses and carries; by analogy with the liquid substance it rushes, overflows, boils; by analogy with the vicious beast it wavers, seizes and torments.

Added: Nov 7, 2017