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Article
Derkachev P., Fedotenkov I. International Journal of Social Economics. 2020. Vol. 47. No. 1. P. 127-144.

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain relations between socioeconomic factors and gender longevity gap and to test a number of contradicting theories.

Design/methodology/approach

Fixed effects models are used for cross-country panel data analysis.

Findings

The authors show that in developed countries (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and European Union) a lower gender longevity gap is associated with a higher real GDP per capita, a higher level of urbanization, lower income inequality, lower per capita alcohol consumption and a better ecological environment. An increase in women’s aggregate unemployment rate and a decline in men’s unemployment are associated with a higher gap in life expectancies. There is also some evidence that the effect of the share of women in parliaments has a U-shape; it has a better descriptive efficiency if taken with a four-year lag, which approximately corresponds to the length of political cycles.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are valid only for developed countries.

Practical implications

The findings are important for policy discussions, such as designs of pension schemes, gender-based taxation, ecological, urban, health and labor policy.

Social implications

The factors that increase male and female longevities also reduce the gender longevity gap.

Originality/value

The results contradict to a number of studies for developing countries, which show that lower economic development and greater women discrimination result in a lower gender longevity gap.

Added: Feb 17, 2020