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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 3
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Article
Yormirzoev M. Economics and Sociology. 2017. Vol. 10. No. 3. P. 72-80.

Tajikistan is an active participant of international migratory flows  since the breakup of the Soviet Union. The primary goal of the paper is to identify factors affecting labor migration to Russia as an important place of destination for Tajik migrants. 

Added: Oct 24, 2017
Article
Denisenko M., Varshavskaya E. Economics and Sociology. 2018. Vol. 11. No. 2. P. 275-288.

This article examines the level and the dynamics of working (economically active) life expectancy in Russia, calculated using the Sullivan method. Our results show that the working life expectancy in Russia is shorter than in European and North American countries. This disadvantage is especially evident for the male population. However, Russian males and females also have the shortest periods of economic inactivity, which is predetermined by a short life expectancy. In the context of mass involvement of young adults in the process of obtaining higher education, the estimated retirement period is calculated to be short. A combination of short periods of working life and economic inactivity, along with a low gender-based diversification in terms of working life expectancy distinguishes Russia from other countries. It has been established that high mortality rate at working age determines a considerable part of losses in working life, primarily among the male population of Russia. The potential for growth of the working life expectancy in Russia is strongly related to further reduction of mortality, primarily within major working age groups.

Added: Jun 30, 2018
Article
Omelchenko E. L., Andreeva J. V., Arif E. et al. Economics and Sociology. 2016. Vol. 9. No. 4. P. 176-190.

The article focuses on consumer strategies of ‘ordinary’ Russian urban youth during a crisis. The authors cover the debate on youth consumer strategies, pointing out subcultural, problematized and lifestyle vectors of research. The article describes consumption trends, in particular ‘conscious consumption’. The main focus is on the intergenerational differences of urban young people’s strategies of consumption. The empirical basis of the research consists of sixty semi-structured interviews conducted with two generations of young people in St. Petersburg, aged 20–25 and 30–35, from different fields of employment: employed in the private sector, in budget-funded organizations and the self-employed. The study shows that the economic crisis put the young people from the two generations into the unequal risk conditions that is neutralized by the sources of different strategies. The way out of this crisis  happens to be a private matter and depends on the ongoing efforts to maximize the efficiency of expense planning by the thirty-year-olds and attempts to save their ‘own money’ by the twenty-year olds.

Added: Dec 7, 2015