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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 9
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Article
Breugelmans S., De Hooge I., Zeelenberg M. Cognition and Emotion. 2011. No. 25. P. 939-946.

Recent research has shown that shame activates both a restore and a protect motive (De Hooge, Zeelenberg, & Breugelmans, 2010), explaining the hitherto unexpected finding that shame can lead to both approach and avoidance behaviours. In the present article we show a clear difference in priority and development of restore and protect motives over time. Our experiment reveals that shame mainly motivates approach behaviour to restore the damaged self, but that this restore motive decreases when situational factors make it too risky or difficult to restore. In contrast, the motive to protect one's damaged self from further harm is not influenced by such situational factors. As a consequence, the approach behaviour thatshame activates may change over time. These findings add to our understanding of the motivational processes and behaviours following fromshame

Added: Dec 24, 2014
Article
Boehm J. K., Lyubomirsky S., Sheldon K. M. Cognition and Emotion. 2011. Vol. 7. No. 25. P. 1263-1272.
Added: Sep 15, 2014
Article
Kosonogov V., Sanchez-Navarro J. P., Martinez-Selva J. M. et al. Cognition and Emotion. 2019. No. 33. P. 683-695.

The social content of affective stimuli has been proposed as having an influence on cognitive processing and behaviour. This research was aimed, therefore, at studying whether automatic exogenous attention demanded by affective pictures was related to their social value. We hypothesised that affective social pictures would capture attention to a greater extent than non-social affective stimuli. For this purpose, we recorded event-related potentials in a sample of 24 participants engaged in a digit categorisation task. Distracters were affective pictures varying in social content, in addition to affective valence and arousal, which appeared in the background during the task. Our data revealed that pictures depicting high social content captured greater automatic attention than other pictures, as reflected by the greater amplitude and shorter latency of anterior P2, and anterior and posterior N2 components of the ERPs.

Added: Sep 20, 2019
Article
Breugelmans S., De Hooge I., Zeelenberg M. Cognition and Emotion. 2007. No. 21. P. 1025-1042.

For centuries economists and psychologists (Frank, 1988; Ketelaar, 2004; Smith, 1759) have argued that moral emotions motivate cooperation. Ketelaar and Au (2003) recently found first evidence that guilt increasescooperation for proselfs in social bargaining games. We investigated whether this effect would also occur for shame, another moral emotion. Using a dyadic social dilemma game in Experiment 1 and an everydaycooperation measure in Experiment 2 as measures for short-termcooperation, we replicated Ketelaar and Au's findings for guilt. However, as predicted on the basis of previous emotion research, we found no such effect for shame. These results clearly indicate that the effects of moral emotions on cooperative behaviour can only be understood if the specific moralemotion is known

Added: Dec 24, 2014
Article
van Osch Y., Zeelenberg M., Breugelmans S. Cognition and Emotion. 2015.

In spite of various claims for cross-cultural differences in the experience of pride, studies on the expression of pride have revealed few cross-cultural differences. Five studies using archival data from Olympic and national championships do show cross-cultural differences in the expression of pride and other positive emotions in pride-eliciting contexts, contingent on the social context of the expression, notably the in-group or out-group status of the audience. Chinese gold medalists were perceived to express less pride than American medalists when outperforming in-group competitors; when outperforming out-group members, however, no or smaller cross-cultural differences were observed. These findings are important because they indicate that cultural norms about emotion expression may be activated only in situations in which they serve a function in coordinating people's behaviour. © 2015 Taylor & Francis

Added: Oct 7, 2015
Article
Noordewier M., Breugelmans S. Cognition and Emotion. 2013. No. 27. P. 1326-1334.
Added: Jul 16, 2015
Article
Breugelmans S., De Hooge I., Zeelenberg M. Cognition and Emotion. 2010. No. 24. P. 111-127.

Shame has been found to promote both approach and withdrawal behaviours. Shame theories have not been able to explain how shame can promote such contrasting behaviours. In the present article, the authors provide an explanation for this. Shame was hypothesised to activate approach behaviours to restore the threatened self, and in situations when this is not possible or too risky, to activate withdrawal behaviours to protectthe self from further damage. Five studies with different shame inductions and different dependent measures confirmed our predictions. We therefore showed that different behavioural responses to shame can be understood in terms of restore and protect motives. Implications for theory and behavioural research on shame are discussed.

Added: Dec 24, 2014
Article
Welten S., Zeelenberg M., Breugelmans S. Cognition and Emotion. 2012. No. 26. P. 836-846.
Added: Jul 16, 2015
Article
van de Ven N., Hoogland C., Smith R. et al. Cognition and Emotion. 2015. Vol. 29. No. 6.

Previous research has yielded inconsistent findings concerning the relationship between envy and schadenfreude. Three studies examined whether the distinction between benign and malicious envy can resolve this inconsistency. We found that malicious envy is related to schadenfreude, while benign envy is not. This result held both in the Netherlands where benign and malicious envy are indicated by separate words (Study 1: Sample A, N = 139; Sample B, N = 150), and in the USA where a single word is used to denote both types (Study 2, N = 180; Study 3, N = 349). Moreover, the effect of malicious envy on schadenfreude was independent of other antecedents of schadenfreude (such as feelings of inferiority, disliking the target person, anger, and perceived deservedness). These findings improve our understanding of the antecedents of schadenfreude and help reconcile seemingly contradictory findings on the relationship between envy and schadenfreude. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

Added: Jul 16, 2015