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Of all publications in the section: 5
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Article
Poder K., Lauri T., Ivaniushina Valeria et al. Studies of Transition States and Societies. 2016. Vol. 8. No. 3. P. 5-28.

In this article, we demonstrate the size of family background eff ects in various regions of Russia and Estonia, concentrating on urban and rural diff erences, addressing the idea that the family background effect is moderated by school level admission policies. Having common path-dependent educational institutions from the communist period, the countries diff er in both the extensiveness of the welfare state and system level school choice policies. However, we see many commonalities in both systems, especially at the urban school level. The family background eff ect is defi ned as the dependence of student achievement on family background characteristics, such as parental education, income and social status. In operationalising family background, the number of books at home and parental education are used as proxies, and its eff ect is measured as a percentage of the individual level PISA 2012 score. We contribute to the literature by studying school choice, its key characteristics and moderating eff ects by school level admission policy in an urban environment.

Added: Dec 4, 2016
Article
Mareeva S., Lezhnina Y. P. Studies of Transition States and Societies. 2019. Vol. 11. No. 2.

This paper provides empirical analysis of income stratification in contemporary Russian society and its dynamics in recent decades. The paper analyses in detail different approaches (absolute and relative) to defining income groups. It is shown that the most widely used thresholds of the absolute approach cannot be efficiently applied to contemporary Russian society, as they fail to define the subgroups within the population, while relative approach, based on the median income as the social standard of living, appears more effective for income stratification in Russia. A specific income stratification scale is suggested. Its application shows that middle-income groups currently dominate in income structure, however, the incomes of their representatives are not high in absolute terms and their living standards are quite modest. Income stratification in Russia has been noticeably transformed over the last 20 years – the middle-income group has been growing while the low income and high-income groups’ shares have been declining. The proposed scale implies possibilities for structural adjustments such as regional- and settlement-specific disparities in income distribution; it can be easily replicated and allows broad potential for future research, including international comparisons of income stratification in societies undergoing transitional processes. 

Added: Sep 9, 2019
Article
Goncharova Natalya, Krupets Y., Nartova Nadya et al. Studies of Transition States and Societies. 2016. Vol. 8. No. 3. P. 29-44.

This article contributes to the debate on portfolio and organisational careers and presents the results of qualitative research on young Russian employees. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Russia has experienced several economic and social crises, which has had a signifi cant impact on the labour market. The employment level remains relatively stable in Russia due to institutionalised precarity. The analysis of 60 in-depth biographical interviews with young employees from St. Petersburg demonstrated that young Russians in the contemporary labour market can be characterised by portfolioability. This term is a multidimensional construct that includes practices, meanings of work, attitudes and capital. Portfolioability is expressed in fl exibility, experience, transferable skills and multiple employment practices. Moreover, it is portfolioability, which in some cases becomes a resource of increasing security in the labour market and developing agency.

Added: Dec 6, 2016
Article
Гончарова Н. В., Krupets Y., Nartova N. et al. Studies of Transition States and Societies. 2016. Vol. 8. No. 3. P. 29-44.

This article contributes to the debate on portfolio and organisational careers and presents the results of qualitative research on young Russian employees. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Russia has experienced several economic and social crises, which has had a signifi cant impact on the labour market. The employment level remains relatively stable in Russia due to institutionalised precarity. The analysis of 60 in-depth biographical interviews with young employees from St. Petersburg demonstrated that young Russians in the contemporary labour market can be characterised by portfolioability. This term is a multidimensional construct that includes practices, meanings of work, attitudes and capital. Portfolioability is expressed in fl exibility, experience, transferable skills and multiple employment practices. Moreover, it is portfolioability, which in some cases becomes a resource of increasing security in the labour market and developing agency.

Added: Oct 23, 2017
Article
Kruusvall J., Vetic R., Berry J. W. Studies of Transition States and Societies. 2009. Vol. 1. No. 1. P. 3-24.
Added: Dec 19, 2014