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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 3
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Article
Kazartsev (Evgenii Kazartcev) E. Style. 2014. Vol. 48. No. 2. P. 119-139.

One of the first comparative studying of metric organized texts is presented in this article. The metrical texts in different languages are studied against the probabilistic models, capable to predict their structural shape and constructed in compliance with certain conditions of versification. As a result of research it appeared that the most severe constraints of versification characterize the German verse and the early samples of Russian iamb, and most lungs -- are typical for the English poetry and for the Russian verse of the second half of 18th -- the beginning of the 19th century. Intermediate position between English (also late Russian) and German verse has the Dutch poetry of 16th-17th century.

Added: Mar 21, 2014
Article
Nikitina T., Rodin (Maslov) B. Style. 2015. Vol. 49. No. 4. P. 439-469.

This essay discusses rhyme and rhythm in syllabo-accentual verse, in which the term “rhythm” refers to stress patterning within the line. Rhyme and rhythm have been investigated in isolation, yet no studies exist that provide a rigorous framework for correlating their effects. This essay shows, based on a thorough statistical analysis of Pushkin's Eugene Onegin, that rhythm of individual lines can mimic rhyming structures within the stanza. In addition, we trace the evolution of the Onegin stanza in the Russian literary tradition, uncovering the ways in which covert transformations of poetic form reflect shifts in literary history from late Romanticism to Modernism.

Added: Sep 24, 2015
Article
Nikitina T., Maslov B. Style. 2016. Vol. 49. No. 4. P. 439-469.

This essay discusses rhyme and rhythm in syllabo-accentual verse, in which the term "rhythm" refers to stress patterning within the line. Rhyme and rhythm have been investigated in isolation, yet no studies exist that provide a rigorous framework for correlating their effects. This essay shows, based on a thorough statistical analysis of Pushkin's Eugene Onegin, that rhythm of individual lines can mimic rhyming structures within the stanza. In addition, we trace the evolution of the Onegin stanza in the Russian literary tradition, uncovering the ways in which covert transformations of poetic formreflect shifts in literary history from late Romanticism to Modernism.

Added: Nov 27, 2016