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Of all publications in the section: 4
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Article
He J., Vasenko A.S., Long R. et al. The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. 2018. Vol. 9. No. 8. P. 1872-1879.

We demonstrate that halide content strongly affects nonradiative electron–hole recombination in all-inorganic perovskite quantum dots (QDs). Using time domain density functional theory and nonadiabatic molecular dynamics, we show that replacing half of the bromines with iodines in a CsPbBr3 QD extends the charge carrier lifetime by a factor of 5, while complete replacement extends the lifetime by a factor of 8. Doping with iodines decreases the nonadiabatic charge–phonon coupling because iodines are heavier and slower than bromines and because the overlap between the electron and hole wave functions is reduced. In general, the nonradiative electron–hole recombination proceeds slowly, on a nanosecond time scale, due to small sub-1 meV nonadiabatic coupling and short sub-10 fs coherence times. The obtained recombination times and their dependence on the halogen content show excellent agreement with experiments. Our study suggests that the power conversion efficiencies of solar cells can be controlled by changing the halide composition in all-inorganic perovskite QDs.

Added: Mar 31, 2018
Article
Zhang L., Vasenko A.S., Zhao J. et al. The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. 2019. Vol. 10. No. 5. P. 1083-1091.

An attractive two-dimensional semiconductor with tunable direct bandgap and high carrier mobility, black phosphorus (BP) is used in batteries, solar cells, photocatalysis, plasmonics and optoelectronics. BP is sensitive to ambient conditions, with oxygen playing a critical role in structure degradation. Our simulations show that BP oxidation slows down charge recombination. This is unexpected, since typically charges are trapped and lost on defects. First, BP has no ionic character. It interacts with oxygen and water weakly, experiencing little perturbation to electronic structure. Second, phosphorus supports different oxidation states and binds extraneous atoms avoiding deep defect levels. Third, soft BP structure can accommodate foreign species without disrupting periodic geometry. Finally, BP phonon scattering on defects shortens quantum coherence and suppresses recombination. Thus, oxidation can be regarded as production of a self-protective layer that improves BP properties. These BP features should be common to other mono-elemental 2D materials, stimulating energy and electronics applications.

Added: Feb 19, 2019
Article
Chistyakov A. A., Zvaigzne M. A., Nikitenko V. R. et al. The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. 2017. Vol. 8. No. 17. P. 4129-4139.

Quantum dot (QD) solids represent a new type of condensed matter drawing high fundamental and applied interest. Quantum confinement in individual QDs, combined with macroscopic scale whole materials, leads to novel exciton and charge transfer features that are particularly relevant to optoelectronic applications. This Perspective discusses the structure of semiconductor QD solids, optical and spectral properties, charge carrier transport, and photovoltaic applications. The distance between adjacent nanoparticles and surface ligands influences greatly electrostatic interactions between QDs and, hence, charge and energy transfer. It is almost inevitable that QD solids exhibit energetic disorder that bears many similarities to disordered organic semiconductors, with charge and exciton transport described by the multiple trapping model. QD solids are synthesized at low cost from colloidal solutions by casting, spraying, and printing. A judicious selection of a layer sequence involving QDs with different size, composition, and ligands can be used to harvest sunlight over a wide spectral range, leading to inexpensive and efficient photovoltaic devices.

Added: Oct 7, 2017
Article
Smirnov G., Stegailov V. The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. 2013. Vol. 3. No. 21. P. 3560-3564.

Recently, a new phase of hydrogen hydrates has been observed at ∼5−7 kbar and ∼170−250 K. X-ray diffraction patterns do not allow determination of its structure unambiguously. In this work, we perform classical molecular dynamics simulation of hydrogen hydrates and select two possible structures. One of these structures is not a typical clathrate and has never been observed for hydrates. In this study, we pay special attention to the choice of the model parameters in order to reveal the corresponding sensitivity of the results.

Added: Mar 19, 2014