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Article

Effect of aerobic training on baseline expression of signaling and respiratory proteins in human skeletal muscle

Physiological Reports. 2018. No. Sep;6(17):e13868. P. 1-13.
Popov D., Lysenko E., Bokov R., Volodina MA, Kurochkina N., Makhnovskii P., Vyssokikh M., Vinogradova O.

Most studies examining the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation of human skeletal muscles to aerobic exercise focused on the response to acute exercise. Here, we examined the effect of a 2-month aerobic training program on baseline parameters in human muscle. Ten untrained males performed a one-legged knee extension exercise for 1 h with the same relative intensity before and after a 2-month aerobic training program. Biopsy samples were taken from vastus lateralis muscle at rest before and after the 2 month training program (baseline samples). Additionally, biopsy samples were taken from the exercised leg 1 and 4 h after the one-legged continuous knee extension exercise. Aerobic training decreases baseline phosphorylation of FOXO1Ser256 , increases that of CaMKIIThr286 , CREB1Ser133 , increases baseline expression of mitochondrial proteins in respiratory complexes I-V, and some regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NR4A3, and CRTC2). An increase in the baseline content of these proteins was not associated with a change in baseline expression of their genes. The increase in the baseline content of regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM and NR4A3) was associated with a transient increase in transcription after acute exercise. Contrariwise, the increase in the baseline content of respiratory proteins does not seem to be regulated at the transcriptional level; rather, it is associated with other mechanisms. Adaptation of human skeletal muscle to regular aerobic exercise is associated not only with transient molecular responses to exercise, but also with changes in baseline phosphorylation and expression of regulatory proteins.