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Regular version of the site

Article

Precautionary bias

European Journal of Public Health. 2017. Vol. 27. No. 3. P. 389.

In June 2016 the European Commission presented criteria to identify endocrine disruptors in the field of plant protection products and biocides(1). The documents approved are instruments for the move to the practice from the WHO general approach with its definition “Endocrine disruptors are substances, both natural and chemical, that can alter the functions of the hormonal system and consequently cause adverse effects on people or animals.”(2) The further excerpt provides the understanding of the state of the science under the regulatory efforts: “although it is clear that certain environmental chemicals can interfere with normal hormonal processes, there is weak evidence that human health has been adversely affected by exposure to endocrine-active chemicals. However, there is sufficient evidence to conclude that adverse endocrine‐mediated effects have occurred in some wildlife species”. This was concluded in 2002, and in 2012 (latest report(2)) evidence base did not improved significantly. Especially it is weak for the effects in humans. It would not be a hyperbolae to say that there is no direct evidence that “endocrine disruptors” as natural or synthetic substances in the environment harms people.