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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 135
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Working paper
Khristoforov I. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2015. No. WP BRP 116/HUM/2015 .
The paper considers the role of public opinion and economic expertise in planning and realization of two important Russia’s financial reforms of the nineteenth century: the creation of the State Bank in 1860 and its reform in 1894. It aims at expanding the limits of institutional history and complimenting it with the analysis of ideological and political context. The focus on the images of «ideal» economic development that existed in public imagination as well as in expert opinion enables to look at the financial policy of the 1860s-1890s from a new prospective.
Added: Dec 17, 2015
Working paper
Savelieva I. M. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2013. No. WP BRP 34/HUM/2013.
The paper analyzes the contents and objectives of ‘public history’, the relationship between scholarly and popular knowledge, conventions governing the representation of the past outside the academic context, and the transfer of scholarly knowledge from academic to media environment. The article is divided into sections titled What? Who? When? Why? What for? and How? These lapidary subtitles reflect the fact that very little has been written about public history yet, and a preliminary review of the field is necessary. First of all, we need to determine what kind of new historical work it is, and to draw several distinctions between different types of historians who engage in professional and/or public history. Public history is treated as a specific type of historical judgment and historical practice, thus the analysis of ‘public history’ cover cognitive aspects as well as social ones.
Added: May 6, 2013
Working paper
Khitrov A. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2015. No. 84.
Contemporary police scholars have argued that it is important to study “how representations of the police and policing are produced and received” (Loader, 1997: 5) and what social meanings are created by them. Police scholars have claimed that police television series produce media images which frame social relations, and social relations, in turn, frame media images (Clarke, 1983, 1992; Lassiter, 1996; Leishman and Mason, 2003: 126, 134–138; Reiner, 2008: 315, 317, 2010: 178). Given that there is no common name for these theoretical assumptions, this paper proposes to use ‘feedback loop theory’ to unite these assumptions into a common framework. In addition to analysing the content of police shows, scholars have recently begun to focus on the stage of production (Colbran, 2014; Lam, 2013) and the stage of reception (Cummins et al., 2014; De Bruin, 2011; Dowler et al., 2006; McClean, 2011). The purpose of this study is to add empirically to reception studies and to test the feedback loop theory by analysing how people discussing fictional police dramas refer to the actual police and police-related issues. I answer these questions by carrying out a content analysis of popular Russian-language internet discussion forums where internet users review Russia’s most famous police show Glukhar’ (2008-2011). The paper shows that this police procedural frames what ordinary citizens and the police chiefs expect from the police, and thus the results of the study illustrate the feedback loop theory.
Added: Jan 27, 2015
Working paper
Selin A. A., Kukushkin K., Sablin I. et al. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2017. No. 149.
The working paper analysed the infrastructure of the Russian-Swedish border from a transcultural perspective. The history of the border was split into three periods following major changes in political border regimes. The first period covered the history of the border between Sweden and the Novgorod Republic after its formal delimitation in 1323. The annexation of the Novgorod Lands to the Grand Duchy of Moscow in 1478 marked the beginning of the second period. The third period, which is discussed in detail, covered the history of border infrastructure between the transition of large part of the Novgorod Lands to Sweden in 1617 and 1700. Departing from the debate whether the border was a line or a zone and overcoming state-centred approaches, the working paper demonstrated that the existence of several parallel border regimes during different periods enabled the simultaneous existence of the border as a line and a zone pertaining to different social interactions and subject to manipulation by authorities. The consolidation of the border did not follow the Treaty of Stolbovo (1617), but owed to local demands and an accidental event of an epidemic in 1629–1630. Following the temporary consolidation of the border, the state established firm border control used for duty collection.
Added: May 12, 2017
Working paper
Khitrov A. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2014. No. 41.
Studies of representations of the police are important because they affect what people think about the police as an organization, what people expect from day-to-day interactions with police officers, and how police officers themselves work in the media-saturated context of contemporary Western societies. This study is based on an approach, which does not strictly separate studies of the police as an organization from studies of how the police are represented. In this paper, I formulate a methodological framework for analysing representations of societal and state institutions in TV series, and I use this framework to then answer the question of how the police are represented in contemporary police TV series in Russia. This paper based on a single-case semiotic study of a popular Russian TV series called Glukhar’. I consider the show’s social and cultural contexts as well as its symbolic structures, such as visual and audial elements and its narrative. I develop a narrative model of the show, argue that the most prominent motif of the show is justification of the police’s illegal actions, and finally build a typology of these justifications. I propose a detailed analysis of two types of justifications and ultimately conclude that the TV show represents the police estranged from the state but not from society. Finally, I argue that my methodological framework can be applied to other TV series in studies, which address representations of societal and state institutions.  
Added: Apr 13, 2014
Working paper
Fedyukin I., Korchmina E. S. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2016
This articles uses the account records books from a variety of Golitsyn estates in the late eighteenth- early ninetieth century to assess the level of "routine corruption" in Imperial Russia. The data from these books allows us to identify individual cases of unofficial payments made by the estates and by peasant commune to the district-level officials; to delimit key types of payment situations; and to calculate the overall volumes of payments. The resulting numbers are compared to the overall volume of obligations carried by the serfs to the state and toothier landlords. Our conclusion is that while the routine unofficial payments were ubiquitous and accompanied any interaction with the state, by the time of Catherine II's reign their volume l was quite low and did not put significant burden on the population. Rather, officials made fortunes by extracting unofficial payments in more targeted ways. gift-giving
Added: Dec 7, 2016
Working paper
Davidson A. B. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2013. No. WP BRP 21/HUM/2013.
This paper is devoted to relations between Russia and South Africa from the mid-17th to the early 19th century. It covers first attempts at sending Russian expeditions around the Cape of Good Hope by Peter the Great and Catherine II and describes how the first Russians reached the Cape from the other end, from Kamchatka. It goes on to describe the trips to the Cape by Russian naval officers and other Russians, some of whom spent a long time in South Africa and left interesting descriptions of the Cape. A unique testimony to the fact that black South Africans knew about Russia is presented in the letter of a Pondo chief to the Russian tsar. The most significant part of Russia’s relations with South Africa was its preoccupation with South African affairs during the Anglo-Boer War of 1899–1900, when Russian volunteers went to fight for the Boers and two medical detachments were sent to treat their wounded. At that time Russia even established diplomatic relations with Transvaal. Mutual interest in the mining sphere is also analysed, and relations between some Russian and South African intellectuals are mentioned. Immigration of Russian Jews to South Africa is also described.
Added: Apr 21, 2013
Working paper
Davidson A. B. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2014. No. WP BRP 66/HUM/2014.
For decades of the Cold War and for centuries before it the interests of both Russian and British academics that studied the history of each other’s countries seemed to be centred mainly on differences and conflicts between them, providing multiple detailed accounts of mutual hostility. History, alas, gave enough ground for this.
Added: Oct 24, 2014
Working paper
Fayer V. V. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2014. No. 97.
The article deals with Russian translations of ancient epic texts that were made in the last few decades. The type of accentual verse that is frequently (but not universally) considered equirhythmic to Greek and Latin hexameter is called Russian hexameter. The first part of the article gives a brief outline of the metrical history of this verse. The second part classifies the trends in contemporary hexametric translations based on the statistics of dactylization. Some experimental forms of Russian hexameter, which have recently been the point of debate, are discussed in the final part of the present work.
Added: Apr 14, 2015
Working paper
Kormina J. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2012. No. 04.
The article analyzes the process of creation and promotion of a new type of saints, the so-called startsy (the elders), which emerged in the Russian Orthodox Church at the end of the 1990s. It focuses on debates about the “styles” of sanctity addressed by the term starets that are supported by different groups of believers. These groups support different strategies to articulate the charisma embodied in starets in terms of its legitimization and characteristics. The article studies these tendencies, using as an example the “career of starets” of the village priest from a remote island in the Pskovskoe lake, which is located 30 km from the Russian-Estonian border. First, I will outline the field of meanings ascribed to the term starchestvo. Then, I will analyze the three-stage “biography of starets Nikoly”, focusing on the ways that his devotees articulate his charisma.
Added: Aug 27, 2012
Working paper
Smilyanskaya E. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2014. No. WP BRP 55/HUM/2014 .
The Mediterranean policy of Catherine the Great gave rise to a discussion about how extreme her colonial ambitions in the Mediterranean were. This article argues against the theories that ‘the Greek idea’ was only a political game for Russia, that Russian activity on the Aegean islands was only military, and that the success of the Archipelago expedition (1769-1775) was primarily due to foreign support. It shows that Catherine II’s colonial ambitions were in fact rather limited compared to other powers of the period. Russia could not imagine having a colony in the eastern Mediterranean, but planned only a small military base surrounded by liberated self-governed Greek territories under the Catherine II’s protection. When the liberated Greek islands became an obstacle to enlarging Russian territory on the Black sea coast, however, they were exchanged, primarily for Crimea.  
Added: May 13, 2014
Working paper
Alexeev A. K. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2014. No. 75.
This paper analyzes the Shia-Sunni interactions in northeastern Iran (Khorasanan) and Central Asia. The Shia-Sunni disputes in the region date back to the Middle Ages after the establishmnet of the Safavids (1501 - 1722) in Iran and Shibanids (1501 -- 1601) in Mawara al-nahr at the beggining of the 16th century. This paper based on narrative sources, attempts to find the true reasons of this phenomenon and to estimate its influence on history and future of the region. An overview of both Sunni and Shiite religious community status in Iran, in Mawara al-nahr, has become particulary important when discussing this issue. 
Added: Nov 26, 2014
Working paper
Starikova E. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2015. No. WP BRP 108/HUM/2015.
This article is devoted to the study of Viet and Muong song lore. The traditional view on folk songs of the Viets assumes autochthonous music and poetry as opposed to high Vietnamese Sinicized culture. In reality, high and popular culture in Vietnam were in a state of mutual influence, that’s why we can suggest that there are Sinitic traits in folk poetry and music of Viets. It can be assumed that there are Sinitic traits even in Muong song lore, but in fact Muong song lore in Muong language is not Sinicized, though Muong folk music is Sinicized.
Added: Oct 18, 2015
Working paper
Mikhailovsky A. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2018. No. 165.
This article in the form of "reflections" is devoted mainly to the reception of Heidegger in Russia as a thinker of being, a conservative critic of late modernity and a "post"-philosopher. On the one hand, due to French postmodernism influence on late Soviet and post-Soviet philosophy Russia has developed a special interest in Heidegger's deconstruction theory. On the other hand, the reception of Heidegger's criticism of European nihilism, totalitarianism and machine technology as the manifestations of modernity has shaped significantly the account of the "political". The current discussion about recently published "Black notebooks" shows the fact of existence of a separate language of description and analysis in Russian philosophical field.
Added: Apr 11, 2018
Working paper
Ladynin I. A. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2017. No. 161.
The problem basically unanswered is whether the Soviet historiography has ever developed an all-embracing concept of antiquity as a slave-owning society and whether it produced a general scheme of this period at all. Two attempts to create a uniform Marxist concept of “slave-owning antiquity” in 1930-1940s (undertaken by the scholars of GAIMK and by A.V. Mishulin with his followers) failed; a real generalization of ancient history was not achieved before 1980s, when it was perceived (not quite in the manner of Marxist method) as the evolution of rural communities rather than slavery.
Added: Dec 9, 2017
Working paper
Volkova I. V. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2018. No. 166/HUM/2018.
This paper is dedicated to the education system in the Soviet Union and school-related issues in the context of the “Great Purge of 1937” - a very symbolic time in the Soviet history that became the climax of the Soviet political repressions but also - a time of the successful completion of the second five-year plan of economic development and other great soviet achievements. The intended research is aimed to clarify how all these events were reflected within the school communities, in what way they influenced the belief system, civil position and general trends in behavior of the senior students, who in the coming years would be bound to become the backbone of a war generation. At the same time, it was the period of the most important decisions within the country’s education system aimed at its participation in society consolidation and thorough preparations of the young generation to clash against some very strong foes. This work reveals the practical consequences of the campaign against a “pedological perversion” within Soviet education system and the process of the teacher selection which stimulated school’s development to be in line with the given ideological directions.
Added: May 15, 2018
Working paper
Kochetkova E., Damtar D., Boliachevets L. et al. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2017
This paper examines Soviet development projects in African countries and Cuba during the Cold War. We analyze types of projects led by Soviet specialists and engage into the question of how Soviets, both leadership and engineers, viewed their roles and impacts as well as challenges on African territory and Cuba. In so doing, this paper analyzes differences and similarities in Soviet penetration to lands with newly established governments in Africa and Cuba.
Added: Feb 21, 2017
Working paper
Shalaeva A. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2014. No. 80.
This paper seeks to establish German Romanticism as the foundation for the process of formation of the humanities as a discipline. The research aims to enquire into the ideas that were crucial for the formation of mythology into discipline. The research explores the role of the romantic philosopher and philologist Friedrich Creuzer’s arguments in relation to the history of science of mythology. The findings of the research illustrate the impact of the different positions in the debates surrounding mythology in the age of German Romanticism and German Idealism on the development of the humanities as a discipline. At the same time as he was studying the symbolism and mythology of the ancients he was acutely influenced by romantic ideas. We suggest that this fact is crucial for the interpretation of the history of mythology as a subject and as a discipline along with the complex interactions between historical, philological and philosophical arguments in Creuzer’s work.
Added: Oct 24, 2014
Working paper
Antineskul O. L., Sheveleva M. S. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2015. No. WP BRP 114/HUM/2015 .
This is a qualitative study of teachers’ attitudes to the content of, and preparation for, BEC exams, which was conducted at the Cambridge Exam Preparation Center in Perm, Russia. Purposive criterion sampling was used to select research participants, who were asked to take part in face-to-face in-depth semi-structured interviews. Overall, the teachers show a positive attitude to BEC at different exam levels. Teaching for BEC proves to be motivational as goal-oriented teaching tends to be more rewarding. The teachers generally recognize that while preparing students for BEC exams they have an opportunity for professional development, namely, in terms of systematic enrichment of Business English vocabulary. The respondents also demonstrate a positive attitude to teaching new content, and acknowledge that teaching for BEC has a positive effect on their university teaching in general because of the relevance of the course to the main curriculum, and its balanced format. The teachers recognize that preparation for BEC exams will be useful for students in their future professional life and are of the opinion that the exam preparation center contributes substantially to improving the University's reputation overall.
Added: Dec 15, 2015
Working paper
Maximova A. S. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2017
The paper dwells upon encountering interactive objects in museums and demonstrates that people there build their skills and knowledge about technologies on two levels: both understanding museum topics and exploring exhibits, and interacting with devices that serve as media of demonstrating objects. First, how museums became interactive and visitor-focused and embraced technological development is explained. Second, some features of interaction with exhibits in museum space are revealed. We analyze two cases of interactive exhibits and elaborate how people read the script of conduct and affordances of an exhibit, orient themselves and coordinate action, engage in social situations, and overcome problems in communication. We argue that how people use interactive exhibits and make sense of their functioning is an important part of museum experience, allowing for technological learning and exploring properties of new technologies.
Added: Nov 26, 2017
Working paper
Ilina K. A. Humanities. HUM. Basic Research Programme, 2014. No. WP BRP 46/HUM/2014.
This article reconstructs the activity of the 'Alexander Yakushev school', a scholarly movement whose representatives over the last 20 years have studied the history of awarding academic degrees in the Russian Empire, the USSR and the Russian Federation. The causes of this school's emergence, its research areas are analyzed, and its achievements are evaluated. The article also assesses the reform plan for the thesis review procedure which Yakushev suggested after the Higher Attestation Commission (VAK) refused to confirm the higher doctorate in law he had been awarded.
Added: May 6, 2014