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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 7
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Working paper
Akifyeva R. N. Working Papers of Centre for German and European Studies. Centre for German and European Studies, 2016. No. 01.
This research studies the child-rearing strategies of Russian-speaking women who live in Madrid by focusing on their children's participation in structured activities. The study answers the following questions: what attitudes to structured activities do the women have, what determined their choice of structured activities, what are the differences in such choices between working-class and middle-class families? The results are based on semi-structured interviews with Russian-speaking women (26 interviews) whose children attend after- or pre- school programs for Russian children, as well as with the teachers or coordinators of these programs (4 interviews). The findings make it possible to formulate conclusions that the class differences in the activities of children are determined by structural factors rather than the cultural logics of parents. All parents reproduce the idea that organized activity has a beneficial effect on a child's development, although they differ in their views on what kind of activities can bring benefits.
Added: Nov 30, 2016
Working paper
Tykanova E. Working Papers of Centre for German and European Studies. Centre for German and European Studies, 2012. No. 9.
Under "contested spaces," which are to be protected by local communities, we mean “geographic locations where conflicts in the form of opposition, confrontation, subversion, and/or resistance engage actors whose social positions are defined by differential control of resources and access to power”1 . Advocacy groups in this case are the associations of people who defend their rights to and interests in some form of benefit. "Strong" advocacy groups, such as municipal governments and investors, are those who decide about urban planning and implement initiatives, whereas the "weak" are those who have to challenge these decisions through the representatives of local communities, NGOs, lobbyists, and the like.
Added: Dec 15, 2017
Working paper
Akifyeva R. N., Erashova V. V. Working Papers of Centre for German and European Studies. Centre for German and European Studies, 2015. No. 3.
The working paper is based on the results of the study of Russian-speaking women who have moved or are going to move to the Netherlands to live with their Dutch partners. Based on an analysis of interviews, we study how their cultural practices and identities form and change in the process of the experience of migration and of living in “mixed” families. Despite the cultural compromise which is inherent to some extent for all families, at the level of identification and certain cultural practices, we observe, in some cases, a tendency towards ethnicization. Respondents begin to interpret a wide range of events and situations in ethnic categories, to actualize ethnic features and differences, as well as to form an orientation towards their concept of national culture. Ethnicity as femininity can act as symbolic capital, which women do not want to lose, and which is highly appreciated by her partner. These trends are explained in terms of integration.
Added: Feb 28, 2016
Working paper
Kabanov Y. Working Papers of Centre for German and European Studies. Centre for German and European Studies, 2014. No. 1.
The article presents a comparative analysis of information (cyber-) security discourses and policies in the European Union and Russia. Based on the concept of securitization, the paper aims to show how external factors and context influence the intersubjective security agenda construction, and how the latter forms institutional and organizational frameworks of security. The possible obstacles and prospects of the EU – Russia cooperation in the area are discussed. 
Added: Feb 15, 2015
Working paper
Zhelnina A. A. Working Papers of Centre for German and European Studies. Centre for German and European Studies, 2012. No. WP/2012/07.
Following the protests in Russia in December 2011 and Spring 2012, interest in public space and how it is conceptualized has grown significantly. So too has interest in the existence of public spaces in cities. Before the protests, the term ‘urban public space’ was used rarely by a small number of specialists in urban planning and urban studies, but it did not exist in the public discourse. However, the unprecedented occupation of open spaces in Russian cities by protesters (both in the form of protest rallies and ‘Occupy Wall Street’-like presence in squares and boulevards) has lead to the discussion of the concept itself, and discussion of the limitations on and opportunities for the use of the urban space by city dwellers: the issue of the quality of the urban public life, public gatherings and spaces for them was raised by the media and the citydwellers.
Added: Jan 25, 2013
Working paper
Nechiporuk D., Belokurova E., Nozhenko M. Working Papers of Centre for German and European Studies. Centre for German and European Studies, 2011. No. 10.
The paper describes some results of the international project “Improving Societal Conditions for the Baltic Sea Protection” (PROBALT) conducted by the international team of scholars from Finland, Germany and Russia in 2009-2011 in the framework of the broader BONUS+ programme. The project rested on the assumptions that the relatively unsuccessful actions aimed to protect the Baltic Sea cannot be explained only by lack of scientific knowledge of the existing ecological problems. Here, an important role is played by the sociocultural factors that influence the course of environmental policy at different levels: supranational, national and subnational. Special attention was drawn to the problem of eutrophication or enrichment of water bodies with the so called biogenic substances (phosphates, nitrogen, etc), which leads to massive algae bloom and lack of oxygen for marine organisms. Therefore, the principal aim of the research was to define the societal conditions for the protection of the Baltic Sea in the cases of the EU and some coastal countries like Finland, Sweden, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia and Russia. But in this Working Paper only the results of the research on the Russian case are presented.
Added: Jun 26, 2012
Working paper
Margarita Kuleva. Working Papers of Centre for German and European Studies. Centre for German and European Studies, 2014. No. 7.
The paper examines social features and cultural profile of the audience of Manifesta 10, first global scaled art-event ever hold in St. Petersburg and Russia as well. Based on the empirical study of 400 formalized interviews with biennale visitors (July-September 2014), this paper compares the audience of Manifesta 10 with visitors of European art-events, firstly previous edition of Manifesta. Despite the democratization of the field of contemporary art (including the elimination of the financial barrier to access to the exhibition), the research shows that the majority of visitors are people with higher education and income slightly exceeding national average. The significant differences were found also: Russian audience is biased towards younger visitors (more than 70% is younger than 35) and gender misbalanced. The study also shows the differences between the patterns of art-tourism in Russia and Europe:  European event attracts larger flows from neighboring regions, in Russia there is a long tail: small groups from many distant locations.   
Added: Feb 16, 2015