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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 3
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Working paper
Novikov D., Krickovic A. International Relations. WP BRP 10/IR/2014. НИУ ВШЭ, 2015
What strategies do rising states use to challenge the established international order and bring about its transformation? This question has received surprisingly little attention, as both realist and liberal theorists have focused on whether or not there will be a demand for change on the part of rising powers. Both schools assume that change will involve open and violent confrontation between status quo powers and challengers. Realists see this as the natural state of affairs and regard great power confrontation to be the major engine of change in international relations. Liberals are more optimistic and argue that rising powers will be more inclined to accept the established order because they find the costs of challenging it to be prohibitive.  We believe that these arguments are flawed in that they limit rising powers to only two options: they can either “beat ‘em” or “join ‘em”. Rising states can either acquiesce to the existing order or wage a full-out frontal assault to overthrow and replace it.In examining the behavior of post-Soviet Russia (the contemporary rising power that has been the most proactive in its opposition to the established order), we find that rising powers have a wider menu of effective strategies available to them – from simply ignoring the parts of the established order that they do not like, to forming new relationships and institutions that achieve specific aims. These strategies allow rising powers to resist the established order and work towards its gradual transformation
Added: Dec 8, 2015
Working paper
Karpova N. S. International Relations. WP BRP 10/IR/2014. НИУ ВШЭ, 2015. No. 25.
The working paper explores the current changes in the world energy markets where Russia has a wide spectrum of economic interests, international projects, as well as problems to be solved in the context with decline in demand and prices for natural gas and other energy commodities, growing contradictions and rivalry among the leading market players, political pressure and the introduction of market restrictions (sanctions). The country needs a new paradigm of development, pre-empting the future and reacting in the moment.
Added: Jan 26, 2016
Working paper
Igor A. Makarov, Likhacheva A. International Relations. WP BRP 10/IR/2014. НИУ ВШЭ, 2014
There is no many areas in the world, almost non-involved in world production. Russian Siberia and the Far East, traditionally are considered only as oil and gas reservoirs, but southern areas of these lands have enormous potential for water-intense production, first – for agriculture but also for paper, metals and mining, hydro energy. This potential is strengthening due to the proximity of the most water demanding and the most dynamic region of the world – Asian-Pacific region (hereinafter, APR). Meanwhile there is no many research dedicated to this opportunities in academic literature. This paper investigates this region, its particularities and challenges this region issues to relevant theories – interdependence theory and its water specification – virtual water concept. The most significant outcomes of the research refer both to theory and strategic studies. We proved the hypothesis that absolute water economy, derived from virtual water trade in some cases may provide a formal improvement in a global scale but worsen water security status and increase a level of water stress in long-term period. Particular implication for Russia and APR is that intense Russian integration to APR virtual water market obviously provides considerable benefits for Russia. But what is more important, strictly according to interdependence theory, Russia, acting as a guarantee of Asian food and water security will provide long-term positive effects for the whole region through diminishing water stress and desecuritization of food trade and water allocation in the region. 
Added: Jan 31, 2014