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Regular version of the site

Book chapter

“Smile and Scream” in The Little Review: Russian Short Fiction and Transatlantic Avant-garde

P. 000-000.

The Little Review (1914-1929), a Chicago-based experimental monthly known as a cradle of
Transatlantic avant-garde, showed an interest in Russian fiction ever since its launch. The
essay demonstrates how a self-declaratively elitist title used Russian prose to promote its
own editorial agenda, form a coterie of loyal readers, and adjust to the perils of modernity.
Russian writers, including modern authors of short fiction, such as Anton Chekhov or Leonid
Andreyev, helped the periodical to articulate their stance on ‘old and new’ culture, the state
of Anglo-American bookmarket, and the art and craft of literary criticism. Furthermore, the
essay argues that The Little Review substantially contributed to Anglo-American journalistic
networking and cultural exchange, with Russian literature playing a crucial role in the
process.










In book

Edited by: R. Hauhart, J. Birkenstein. Lexington Books, 2021.