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Regular version of the site

Book chapter

The Void of Thought and the Ambivalence of History: Chaadaev, Bakunin, Fyodorov

Chepurin K., Dubilet A.

What our paper as a whole traces is the way that the declarations of nothingness, anarchy, and cosmism all
offer a “Russian” mode of thought that is radically decoupled from national identity, particularity, or ethnos –
a mode of thought that is preoccupied with and immanently affirms nothingness or the void. To think by
beginning with the void is to delegitimate the world – to unground its mechanisms of power, succession, and
reproduction. But it is also to think immanently out of this void – to think a future decoupled from tradition
and history, and their (sovereign, no less than sacrificial) logics of violence and oppression. In this, the
(im)properly Russian thinking of nothingness remains genealogically and conceptually relevant to the debate
within contemporary continental philosophy, political theology, and humanities theory broadly construed.








In book

Routledge, 2021.