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Regular version of the site

Book chapter

Self-esteem Motivation: Examining its Benefits and Costs in Academic Domain

P. 77-77.
Gordeeva T. O., Sychev O., Lunkina M.

Is self-esteem motivation a problem?  Although Crocker and Park (2004)  suggest that it often is, little research has directly evaluated self-esteem as a motive; instead, self-esteem has been studied primarily as a trait.  Self-esteem motivation defined as a desire to prove oneself that he is able to perform the task, so he could respect himself we consider as a type of extrinsic motivation based on  competence need (Deci & Ryan, 2002). Participants were 504 10th grade students.  Students’ reasons for studying were assessed with a modified  version of the AMS (Vallerand et al., 1992) with additional self-esteem motivation subscale. The subscales show adequate internal consistency  (Cronbach’s alphas  ranged from .71 to .90) and the results of  CFA  performed through SEM support the structural validity of  the  questionnaire. The results demonstrate that self-esteem motivation lies in between identified motivation and  introjected motivation. We show  that self-esteem motivation is a reliable predictor of time for homework and academic persistence (grit), which in its turn predicts GPA  (χ2=70.49; df=39; p<0.01; RMSEA=0.054; CFI=0.933). In sum, self-esteem motivation is quite common  type of academic motivation that has some obvious benefits comparing to external and introjected motivation, although it is not as desirable as intrinsic motivation. 

In book

Melbourne: Institute for Positive Psychology and Education Melbourne, 2017.