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Regular version of the site

Book chapter

The rise of Nazism and the Web: Social media as platforms of racist discourses in the context of the Greek economic crisis

P. 109-130.

110 In this chapter, we examine the strategic use of social media by GD, focusing on the ways it attempts to legitimise its social imaginaries, tactics, strategies and reality constructions, taking advantage of the social turbulence that austerity politics and neo- liberal restructuring have brought since late 2009. While GD‘s public legitimisation has been closely interweaving with established state power, manifested in its close relation and frequent collaboration with police forces, its political vision is also distinct from the latter to the extent that it wishes to enable a constituent counter-power, aiming both to disarticulate its liberal dimensions and occupy its apparatuses. GD treats the liberal state apparatus as both a partner and an adversary to be infiltrated and subjugated. This idea of state power as being both a partner and adversary for fascist politics is associated with New Marxist approaches to fascism (Poulantzas 1970; Vajda 1976) that see fascism more as a ―relatively autonomous‖ force and an outcome of specific historical conditions and less as an ―inevitable stage‖ of capitalist development (Kitchen 2003, 58). In reverse, while liberal power often instrumentalises fascist discourse and practices in the form of an ―authoritarian governmentality‖ (Dean 2010), at specific moments— as in the case of the recent persecution of GD members in Greece — it can also explicitly denounce and suppress fascism.