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Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 68
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Article
Semyonov D., Platonova D. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2016. No. 2(8). P. 23-24.

The quarter-century evolution of the Russian institutional landscape consisted of periods of rapid marketization and state-driven correction. The ‘natural’ diversification times were followed by a selective system segmentation into several tiers. During the post-Soviet period most higher education institutions changed their profiles (even though keeping their old names). Many new institutions have emerged; they form entirely new groups of higher education institutions. Yet, the Russian higher education design is still work-in-progress. The development is under path-dependency effect originated both from the Soviet and post-Soviet periods. Different stakeholders participate in the ongoing process of consensus-building, either in the policy-making field or public discussions

Added: Mar 9, 2017
Article
Gokhberg L. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2017. No. 1(11). P. 19-21.

The Foresight and STI Governance academic journal (http://foresight-journal.hse.ru/en/) has been published by the Institute for Statistical Studies and Economics of Knowledge (ISSEK) at the Higher School of Economics since 2007. The journal’s success was gradually expressed in a series of domestic and international evaluation exercises which resulted in getting included into the Scopus database (2013), receiving a grant from the program intended to support leading national academic journals administered by the Ministry for Education and Science of the Russian Federation (2014), and obtaining a stronger ranking position within the Scopus Q2 segment (2015). A growing inflow of articles from a more and more diversified spectrum of countries, increasing downloads and citations are also critical signs of the journal’s progress. What factors have contributed to this success?

Added: Mar 6, 2017
Article
Rudakov V. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2020. Vol. 24. No. 3. P. 8-9.

More than half of Russian university students combine study and work and dedicate on average 2/3 of their working week to paid work. A significant motivation for employment while studying, in addition to financial motivation, is the necessity to obtain work experience, which is valued by employers as an additional signal of the abilities of university graduates and their soft skills. Student employment does not considerably affect academic achievement due to the relatively low educational workload and the limited intensity of student employment. There is a significant and large positive effect of student employment on salaries of graduates in the early stages of their careers.

Added: Dec 14, 2020
Article
Yanbarisova D., Pavlenko E. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2015. No. 3. P. 13-14.

Combining job and studies is quite often the case both in Russia and in Europe. But today researchers all over the world seek to explain the increase in the number of working students and in hours they spend working. In Russia, the situation is exacerbated by a decreasing value of formal education for employers, which can make a working experience a basic prerequisite to participate in the labor market entry competition.

Added: May 27, 2015
Article
Romanenko K. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2019. Vol. 21. No. 3. P. 11-12.

This paper describes student research field trips as a new educational tool. These are intense, short-term trips by students and their teachers to do field work. Field work itself is not an innovation, but one of the main approaches to discover and understand the world. Geography, ethnography, and archeology are mainly based on field work. Some of the elements of field work such as travel and collaborative work are also known as traditional approaches in education, for example the “Grand Tour” of young aristocrats around Europe in 17th and 18th centuries, which was a final and necessary part of their education; the value of collective, shared responsibility, and common tasks in the theory and practice of pedagogy of Soviet educator and social worker Anton Makarenko; or even the traditions of the Pioneer and Scouting movements in the 20th century. A better term might be “an old-new method in education” and it could be seen as an answer to the extremely fast changes occurring in higher education. In this case the new (or “old-new”) tool does not try to follow these rapid changes but does at its own pace. In the new educational reality of the massification of higher education, global educational migration, and MOOCs, they are like the slow food movement or small craft industries in a world of fast food corporations and mass production.

Added: Nov 13, 2019
Article
Chernenko O. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2017. No. 2(12). P. 15-18.

In 2014, International Summer University was launched at Higher School of Economics in addition to other summer programs. The Summer University (SU) is a platform where students from all over the world come for two months to take courses by HSE’s leading professors. SU is aimed at three equally important goals: making regular HSE programs and exchange education (exchange programs, study abroad) attractive for international students, internationalising educational processes at HSE, and improving the university’s international visibility. On the one hand, the Summer University shares some features typical for traditional summer schools, on the other hand, it is quite different from other short-term educational programs. In this brief paper I will try to: a) identify SU student body; b) analyse SU student body; c) outline prospects for further development.

Added: Jun 5, 2017
Article
Roshchina Y. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2014. No. 2. P. 6-7.

This research is based on the Economics of Education Monitoring data for the period of 2010-2013 by Higher School of Economics. Analysis has confirmed the original hypotheses: 1) university teachers’ secondary employment and research work can be divided into clusters depending on the type of their specific activities; 2) the choice of this or that particular style often depends on the type of university and one’s professional specialisation; 3) the number of publications varies significantly among the researchers belonging to different categories.

Added: Oct 23, 2014
Article
Efimov D. B., Gruzdev I. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2019. No. №3 (21). P. 19-21.

In “The University: an owner’s manual” Henry Rosovsky points out that there is a lack of consensus on how teaching should be evaluated, whereas there is more clarity with assessing achievements in research. However, most universities see the need to reward outstanding teaching work and to identify cases of unsatisfactory teaching. In this article we make a brief overview of the instruments used at HSE University for these purposes.

Added: Mar 8, 2020
Article
Vilkova K., Shcheglova I., Dremova O. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2021. Vol. 27. No. 2. P. 12-14.

     

Added: Apr 27, 2021
Article
Shilov V. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2016. No. 4 (10). P. 6-7.
Added: Jan 24, 2018
Article
Smolentseva A. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2016. Vol. 2. No. 8. P. 6-8.

This paper provides a comparative analysis of massification of higher education and transformations of institutional landscape across 15 post-Soviet counties.

Added: Oct 13, 2017
Article
Zavgorodnyaya O. I. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2016. No. 3(9). P. 7-9.

The article analyzes the institute of doctoral awarding in Russia, focuses on the relationship between postgraduate education and dissertation defence. The author describes the national system of degree conferral (generic and country-specific characteristics).

Added: Nov 25, 2016
Article
Kataeva Z., DeYoung A. J., Jonbekova D. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2016. No. 2(8).
Added: Jun 28, 2016
Article
Sterligov I. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2017. No. 1(11). P. 11-13.

eLIBRARY.ru, а dominant regional bibliometric database, currently indexes 5279 scholarly journals, 4755 of them Russian. It is a vast universe of supposedly academic literature, largely unknown to those who do not understand Russian. In this paper I will provide a brief overview of the leading players in this field: 10 megajournals, which, taken together, annually publish much more articles than all Russian yearly output in the Web of Science (WoS) Core Collection. I will utilize a set of various metrics to capture this remarkable phenomenon. All data is sourced from eLIBRARY.ru and journal websites, and none of these journals are indexed in the WoS or Scopus databases. At the same time, one should realize that these ten are just the tip of the iceberg.

Added: Mar 6, 2017
Article
Chirikov I. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2015. No. 3. P. 10-11.
Added: Jun 27, 2015
Article
Malinovskiy S, Froumin I. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2015. Vol. 5. No. 3. P. 11-13.
Added: Oct 1, 2018
Article
Bekova S. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2020. No. 3. P. 21-22.
Added: Dec 14, 2020
Article
Sidorkin A. M. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2015. No. 2(4). P. 8-10.
Added: Jul 15, 2015
Article
Roshchina Y. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2016. No. 3 (9). P. 16-17.

Economics of Education Monitoring data show that though 85% of students recognize the labor market benefits of having a PhD degree, the demand for doctoral education among Russian students decreased in 2010-2015 com­pared to 2006-2009. The intention to pursue a PhD is correlated with having a focus on building an academic career. It is important to mention that regression analysis has shown that a good academic environment at one’s uni­versity, one’s own commitment to one’s work and studies, and one’s parents’ human capital have a positive impact on one’s motivation to pursue a PhD.

Added: Oct 21, 2016
Article
Romanenko K. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2018. Vol. 15. No. 1. P. 16-17.

Mergers are common practice in higher education systems around the world, and merger-related aspects, such as the transformation of organizational and administrative structures, the impact on internal funding allocation mechanisms or changes in academic strategies and profiles, are well researched. Besides the issues of funding after a merger or organizational structure transformation, one of the most common problems is the “human factor.” It includes differences of university cultures in merging universities, protests before the mergers and conflicts afterwards ignited by university staff and especially students. But the role of students in university mergers and their understanding of these processes are hardly investigated at all. So, research is necessary to find better managerial decisions during merger processes and to understand actual students’ interests in contemporary universities overall. The first step is to clarify the most sensitive changes for students during university mergers.

Added: May 16, 2018