• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 68
Sort:
by name
by year
Article
Abramov R., Gruzdev I., Terentev E. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2017. Vol. 3. No. 13. P. 14-15.
Added: Dec 1, 2017
Article
Bischof L., Tofan A. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2016. No. 2(8). P. 21-23.

The Republic of Moldova has a long history of shifting borders, and a short history as an independent state. Higher education only expanded during the Soviet era, which saw 9 public higher education institutions come into existence between 1926 and 1988. On the one hand, ample state funding for higher education allowed an unprecedented growth in access to higher education, a well-developed technical and material base, and internationally comparable educational standards. On the other hand, high level of centralization of the Soviet educational system made it static and unable to adequately respond to the changing needs of a dynamic labor market. Strict educational centralization led to bureaucratization of management, authoritarianism, excessive uniformity, lack of understanding of local conditions, stifling of ‘bottom-up’ initiative, and lack of academic mobility. At the time of the collapse of the Soviet Union, participation in higher education was still the third lowest among all Soviet republics.

Added: Apr 27, 2017
Article
Sterligov I. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2014. No. 1. P. 11-14.
Added: Jan 29, 2015
Article
Gruzdev I., Terentev E. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2016. No. 3 (9). P. 20-21.

With the new Federal Law on Education introduced in Russia in the late 2012, postgraduate training became the third level of higher education. The framework of PhD education has changed. Before 2013, doctoral education, which was one of the systems that had been inherited from the Soviet period, was officially considered as a track to academia, while now it works in a wider scope of highly qualified personnel training. But does this mean that the days when it was thought that all PhDs should become academics are gone? We have addressed this question to PhD students themselves and are reporting data from a recent survey conducted by Higher School of Economics’ Centre for Institutional Research in several Russian universities this spring. Thirteen Russian universities participated in the survey administrated online. Most of them are considered to be leading institutions of higher education in Russia. Overall 2221 students from different fields filled in the questionnaire (26% representing social sciences, 8% – education, 28% – mathematical and natural sciences, 12% – humanities, 26% – engineering and technological sciences). 51% of the respondents were males, 16% were part-time students. We asked the respondents about their future career plans, their willingness to find a job at their home university or to continue studies abroad. We counted weighted average for all indicators to neutralize the differences in size of the institutions in the sample.

Added: Jul 25, 2018
Article
Lando S. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2015. No. 4(6). P. 6-8.

Traditions of mathematical education in Russia on both school and university level, research done by Russian sci￾entists and its impact on the development of mathematics is considered by many a unique and valuable part of the world cultural heritage. In the present paper, we describe the de￾velopment of mathematical education in Russian universi￾ties after 1955 — a period that proved to be most fruitful.

Added: Apr 2, 2016
Article
Esterov A. I. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2015. No. 4(6). P. 14-16.

Math in Moscow (MiM) is the name of a short-term (1-2 semesters) study abroad program offered in English joint￾ly by the Independent University of Moscow (IUM), Na￾tional Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE), and Moscow Center for Continuous Mathematical Education (MCCME). It was first launched in spring 2001 by IUM. Along with courses in mathematics and comput￾er science, students can study Russian language, Russian literature, history of mathematics and science, and history of Russia. All MiM courses are credited to the students at their home institutions.

Added: Apr 2, 2016
Article
Tsfasman M. A., Gusein-Zade S. M., Ilyashenko Y. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2017. No. 1(11). P. 21-22.

Moscow Mathematical Journal (MMJ) is one of the youngest among the leading mathematical journals in Russia. By leading we mean that MMJ is consistently among top six Russian mathematical journals by any formal or informal criterion. The journal was created by Yu. S. Ilyashenko and M. A. Tsfasman to mark the new millennium, the first volume being published in 2001. MMJ’s founding organization was the Independent University of Moscow (IUM). IUM is a small non-state university established in 1991 by a group of well-know mathematicians including V. I. Arnold, S. P. Novikov, Ya. G. Sinai, L. D. Faddeev. It is aimed primarily at preparing professional mathematicians. IUM was to a large extent a basis for creating the mathematical department at Higher School of Economics. (For more info on IUM see: http://ium. mccme.ru/.) The success of the journal is mostly due to the reputation of IUM, well known on the international scale and, more generally, to the reputation of the Moscow mathematical school.

Added: Mar 6, 2017
Article
Radaev V. V. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2017. No. 1(11). P. 18-19.

The Journal of Economic Sociology (Ekonomicheskaya Sotsiologiya) (http://ecsoc.hse.ru/en) was established in 2000. It was one of the first academic e-journals in Russia at the time when only 3.6% of Russians had Internet access, uploading a 1Mb file took up to 10 minutes on average, and 56% of urban residents in Russia did not have an idea what the Internet meant.

Added: Mar 6, 2017
Article
Fedorovykh D. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2021. No. 1. P. 19-21.

Matching students with universities in Russia occurs via a complicated procedure. Most students are admitted based on the Unified State Exam (USE)—a standardized government-organized test, while the most selective universities enroll the winners of the Olympiads—intellectual competitions for high-schoolers. Olympiads have a long history in Russia—enthusiasts organized the first mathematical competitions in the 1960s. Today, there are hundreds of Olympiads in which high school students compete in all school subjects and in non-curriculum fields, such as robotics, critical thinking, creative writing, and business. Some Olympiad awards (in most cases, at the university's discretion) open the doors to a bachelor's program bypassing all examinations; others exempt students from certain subjects in USE.

Added: Apr 12, 2021
Article
Tumkovskiy S. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2018. No. 1. P. 9-11.

The article presents the results of the Association of MIEM and the National research University " Higher school of Economics"

Added: Apr 7, 2018
Article
Abramov R., Terentev E. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2020. No. 27. P. 23-24.

The forced transition to distance learning in March 2020 was a stress test for the Russian higher education system. It affected all aspects of university life and demanded a radical restructuring of internal processes and principles. It also affected external communications with the regulator and other participants in the events, some of whom were not directly related to education, but began to play a decisive role in a pandemic (for example, the Russian Ministry of Health). Students, teachers and researchers were forced to adapt to the new conditions and to master new digital technologies and work methods, often experimenting on themselves, their colleagues and students through trial and error. The administration of universities and the Ministry of Science and Higher Education (MoSHE) needed to organize and provide infrastructure for this unprecedented "experiment" extremely quickly. Despite all the difficulties and problems, the Russian higher education system as a whole, passed this stress test. However, the pandemic has exposed a number of systemic challenges and problems that go beyond the current moment and are important for the development of higher education in general. One of these challenges is the ineffectiveness of hierarchical management models with declining institutional and academic autonomy. This text discusses this problem and reflects on solutions for restructuring universities in the post-pandemic period.

Added: May 13, 2021
Article
Shmatko N. A. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2016. Vol. 9. No. 3 (9). P. 9-11.

PhD holders’ careers analysis shows that getting an academic degree is no longer enough for a career in research. The chances of getting a permanent job, of getting a good position at a university or research center depend not only on one’s academic degree but also on one’s experience, competencies and portfolio. The route from defending a dissertation to getting tenure is becoming longer: it now includes all kinds of temporary positions, such as internships and fixed-time (postdoc) contracts. Research projects are focused on mobility at both national (changing jobs within the national labor market) and international levels (which implies moving abroad to work or to study, contracts with foreign employers, participation in joint research programs, etc.)

Added: Oct 13, 2016
Article
Demin M. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2015. Vol. 3. No. 5. P. 19-20.

Philosophy played a very specific role in the Soviet system of science and education. What happened to philosophy after the collapse of the Soviet Union? According to statistics, the number of universities in the Russian Federation that offer educational programs in the field of philosophy increased almost 10 times in the post-Soviet period: from 5 to 47. How can we explain this growth and what does it mean in terms of the dynamics of disciplines within the scope of humanities?

Added: Nov 2, 2015
Article
Ananin D., Pravdyuk A. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2020. No. 2 (23). P. 27-30.

The impact of postdoctoral research and the effects of postdoctoral fellowships from all over the world has increased the interest of leading universities, research institutions and the business sector in the recruitment of postdocs. The opening of new positions and the implementation of new training programs makes postdocs an important, but very particular group of scholars in the scientific community; a group who face many challenges and uncertainties. The temporal nature of postdoctoral positions transforms this category of academic researchers into scientific ambassadors and creative, independent, mobile, and engaged insiders of the global research landscape. The title of the most famous book about postdocs is “The postdoc landscape: The invisible scholar” (2018) edited by Jaeger and Dinin, however one can assert that due to the increasing attention to PhD graduate research, postdocs have definitely become visible and become one of the top topics on the research agenda. Many researchers have contributed to the overview of different aspects of the postdoctoral phenomenon in terms of policy, the labor market, the academic landscape and the economy. Features, including position specificity, career prospects, research productivity, collaboration development, non-academic options, and the commercialization of research, have been investigated by contemporary scholars. In this reading list, we offer some of the most cited, well-known, and newest articles representing the latest surveys of postdoctoral issues. Earlier scientific works focus on the study of postdocs’ backgrounds, their expectations and career prospects regarding different research fields and gender. The actual research of postdocs has moved from general to specific issues: postdoctoral research productivity, the commercialization of postdoctoral programs and postdoc technology transfer into the non-academic sector. Commercialization goals predetermine the necessity for the multiplicity of postdoctoral programs (startup postdoc program), the internationality of postdocs (scientific networks) and the improvement of postdoc support (supervision, mentoring etc.). This reading list is a useful tool for the administrative development of postdoctoral programs at universities, and other research and non-academic institutions. The papers listed below include unique autobiographical stories of postdocs published in Science and Nature. These authors, except for the paper by Nerad and Cerny, share their viewpoints and professional insights into different postdoc issues. Based on personal experience, the scholars represent the postdoc not only as an abstract subject, but also as a real living actor in academic society. Reported successes and failures of postdocs can help young researchers better plan their career and managers raise the efficacy of postdoctoral programs.

Added: Oct 1, 2020
Article
Timorin V. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2015. No. 4(6). P. 9-10.

It is widely known that Soviet school of exact sciences, was among the strongest in the world, particularly in terms of physics and mathematics. Why? This is the question we would like to address in this paper by collecting and sum￾marizing different viewpoints on this issue expressed by prominent mathematicians. Many of them witnessed the most fruitful period, the “golden years” of Soviet science and played a major role in the subsequent development of Soviet/Russian mathematics. There is little controversy in the explanations provided by different people; the only es￾sential differences are in the emphases. Thus the list of fac￾tors may be regarded as precisely determined. This paper simply aims at communicating them to a non-mathematical community interested in issues of science and education.

Added: Apr 2, 2016
Article
Sterligov I., Savina T. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2016. No. 1(7). P. 9-12.

Metrics usage in higher education management has clearly become an issue of great importance. A recent high-profile policy report on this topic, commissioned by the Higher Education Funding Council for England, is aptly named The Metric Tide. It reiterates a number of basic princi￾ples like “don’t evaluate individuals using journal impact factors” or “peer review can’t be substituted by metrics,” and stresses that, “those involved in research assessment and management should behave responsibly, considering and preempting negative consequences [of metrics usage] wherever possible” (Wilson 2015). One of the obvious consequences is gaming with indica￾tors, which comes in various types and level of severity. This paper deals with one particular technique centered around so-called “predatory” journals indexed in Scopus database. It is a part of a broader research on the impact of metrics-based policy measures on various university sys￾tems. See the introductory article about “predatory” pub￾lishing by the foremost authority on this topic prof. Jeffrey Beall, p. 07.

Added: Apr 2, 2016
Article
Lovakov A., Alipova O. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2018. No. 4(18). P. 14-15.
Added: Jan 18, 2019
Article
Falkovich Y., Pravdyuk A., Gabdrakhmanov N. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2020. Vol. 2. No. 23. P. 19-21.

The system of postdoctoral fellowships in Russia is relatively new. The first postdoctoral programs started to appear only in 2013.  Their development was accelerated by “5-100” Russian Academic Excellence Project initiated by Russian Ministry of Education and Science. Postdoctoral initiatives started to be implemented in over 10 Russian universities - project participants – as well as Lomonosov Moscow State University and Saint Petersburg State University.  Most programs were designed to follow the western model of postdoctoral fellowships (postdocs). Originally, the aim of such programs was to attract scholars with high scientific potential and various research backgrounds to carry out their independent research as well as extend the pool of a university research projects. The universities generally expect external candidates with PhD degree (or its Russian equivalent, stepen’ kandidata nauk/Candidate of Sciences degree), publications in high-ranked international academic journals and international experience. These young researchers are 30 years old in average , with advanced knowledge of English.  Conducting research is the primary   task of postdocs. They can also be involved in joint research work with students, fellow scientists, as well as  in giving open lectures and holding seminars. As a rule, call for applications is opened both for foreign and Russian researchers. However, Russian universities focus their efforts on attracting international colleagues to a greater extent .  The positioning of postdoctoral programs in Russia is still under development and reflection. For instance, Russian universities sometimes compare it with the well-known system of Doctorantura, education program for Candidate of Sciences who are willing to get the degree of Doctor of Sciences. As,  for example, National Research Tomsk State University claims that “The Institute of Postdoctoral Studies at TSU replaced Doctorantura, familiar to all of us ” , National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University calls its postdoctoral program “Postdoc of TPU as an analogue of Doctorantura” .  The second aim of the Russian universities is to use the postdoctoral Programs as a tool of international recruiting.  These are the cases of Ural Federal University, Novosibirsk State University, Far Eastern Federal University e.t.c. So, Russian universities currently regard postdoctoral programs as a development tool of their staff.

Added: Aug 17, 2020
Article
Falkovich Y., Gabdrakhmanov N., Pravdyuk A. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2020. Vol. 2. No. 23. P. 19-21.

The system of postdoctoral fellowships in Russia is relatively new. The first postdoctoral programs started to appear only in 2013.  Their development was accelerated by “5-100” Russian Academic Excellence Project initiated by Russian Ministry of Education and Science. Postdoctoral initiatives started to be implemented in over 10 Russian universities - project participants – as well as Lomonosov Moscow State University and Saint Petersburg State University.  Most programs were designed to follow the western model of postdoctoral fellowships (postdocs). Originally, the aim of such programs was to attract scholars with high scientific potential and various research backgrounds to carry out their independent research as well as extend the pool of a university research projects. The universities generally expect external candidates with PhD degree (or its Russian equivalent, stepen’ kandidata nauk/Candidate of Sciences degree), publications in high-ranked international academic journals and international experience. These young researchers are 30 years old in average , with advanced knowledge of English.  Conducting research is the primary   task of postdocs. They can also be involved in joint research work with students, fellow scientists, as well as  in giving open lectures and holding seminars. As a rule, call for applications is opened both for foreign and Russian researchers. However, Russian universities focus their efforts on attracting international colleagues to a greater extent .  The positioning of postdoctoral programs in Russia is still under development and reflection. For instance, Russian universities sometimes compare it with the well-known system of Doctorantura, education program for Candidate of Sciences who are willing to get the degree of Doctor of Sciences. As,  for example, National Research Tomsk State University claims that “The Institute of Postdoctoral Studies at TSU replaced Doctorantura, familiar to all of us ” , National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University calls its postdoctoral program “Postdoc of TPU as an analogue of Doctorantura” .  The second aim of the Russian universities is to use the postdoctoral Programs as a tool of international recruiting.  These are the cases of Ural Federal University, Novosibirsk State University, Far Eastern Federal University e.t.c. So, Russian universities currently regard postdoctoral programs as a development tool of their staff. 

Added: Aug 17, 2020
Article
Dyachenko E., Fursov K. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2017. Vol. 1. No. 11. P. 7-9.
The paper summarises results of a pilot study aimed at assessment of the representation of Russian science in the media in order to understand to what extent contemporary Russian academic journals are included into popular science communication. The analysis showed that most of the media publications reporting on the achievements of Russian scientists did not cite academic publications. Low visibility of Russian scholarly journals in popular media calls into question the importance of their role in science communication. The probable reason for that in the Russian academia, “the weight” of a statement depends more on the social status of a scientist or other public figure than on the system of scientific communication through professional journals.  

 

 

Added: Mar 3, 2017
Article
Pislyakov V. Higher Education in Russia and Beyond. 2017. No. 4(14). P. 7-10.
Added: Dec 12, 2017