• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site
Of all publications in the section: 8
Sort:
by name
by year
Article
Behrens K. Canadian Journal of Economics. 2016. Vol. 49. No. 4. P. 1293-1339.
Added: Oct 13, 2016
Article
Nikitin M., Claudia M. L., Antinolfi G. Canadian Journal of Economics. 2007. Vol. 40. No. 2. P. 628-649.

Empirical evidence suggests non-linearity in the impact of inflation on financial intermediation and real activity. Evidence also suggests that high inflation affects financial intermediation through the substitution of dollars 'under the mattress' for savings in domestic banks. We model an economy where inflation and real activity are positively related at low levels of inflation. However, when the inflation rate exceeds a threshold, agents substitute dollars for deposits issued by domestic banks, reducing the scale of financial intermediation and investment. As a consequence, at high levels of inflation, capital stock and output become negatively related to the inflation rate.

Added: Oct 18, 2018
Article
Antinolfi G., Landeo C. M., Никитин М. Canadian Journal of Economics. 2007. Vol. 40. No. 2. P. 628-649.
Added: Nov 13, 2009
Article
Djankov S., Hoekman B. Canadian Journal of Economics. 2000. No. 33(1). P. 190-212.
Added: Sep 30, 2014
Article
Russell S., Никитин М. Canadian Journal of Economics. 2006. Vol. 39. No. 1. P. 348-374.
Added: Nov 13, 2009
Article
Nikitin M. Canadian Journal of Economics. 2006. Vol. 39. No. 1. P. 348-374.
Added: Oct 19, 2010
Article
Hepenstrick C., Tarasov A. Canadian Journal of Economics. 2015. Vol. 48. No. 4. P. 1561-1599.

This paper quantitatively explores the role of the demand structure in explaining the relationship between an importer's per capita income and the extensive margin of bilateral trade. The underlying mechanism is based on the fact that agents expand the set of goods they consume with income. This in turn affects the structure of a country's import demand and therewith the extensive margin of trade. We formalize this intuition by incorporating preferences that allow for binding non-negativity constraints into an otherwise standard Ricardian multi-country model. We quantify the model using the data on US consumer expenditures and aggregate values of bilateral trade flows and find that the behavior of the model's extensive margin of bilateral trade is consistent with the data (as opposed to the standard model). Two popular counterfactual experiments - lower trade costs and the rise of China and India - demonstrate that the mechanism outlined in this paper is indeed quantitatively important.

Added: Oct 2, 2015
Article
Behrens K., Picard P. Canadian Journal of Economics. 2007. Vol. 40. No. 4. P. 1118-1148.
Added: Nov 23, 2013